Driving the Indians Westward: Indian Removal to 1840 - Research Article from Westward Expansion Reference Library

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First Encounters

The very first encounters between whites and Indians in what would become the United States were peaceful and mutually beneficial. In fact, Indians probably ensured the survival of the colony that was established at Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607. Ill prepared for the harsh winters, the British colonists died in massive numbers until a local Algonquian Indian leader known as Powhatan (c. 1550–1618) provided them with food. Later the Indians helped the colonists plant native foods and harvest a weed known as tobacco (which would later become a major source of colonial income). Of course, the most famous instance of Indian friendship with settlers occurred at Plymouth, Massachusetts, where Indians helped the Pilgrim colonists grow food and learn how to use the land. Such Indian-white cooperation is now celebrated with the Thanksgiving holiday. White colonists also proved helpful to Indians, largely by providing...

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This section contains 4,588 words
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Buy the Driving the Indians Westward: Indian Removal to 1840 Encyclopedia Article
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Westward Expansion Reference Library
Driving the Indians Westward: Indian Removal to 1840 from Westward Expansion Reference Library. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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