Diesel Cycle Engines - Research Article from Macmillan Encyclopedia of Energy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 16 pages of information about Diesel Cycle Engines.
This section contains 4,690 words
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Four-Stroke-Cycle Engine

The four-stroke-cycle internal-combustion engine design is widely employed in both gasoline and diesel engines. The high-speed four-stroke-cycle diesel engine produces superior fuel economy, lower noise factors, and ease of meeting exhaust emissions regulations over its two-stroke-cycle counterpart. In the four-stroke-cycle diesel engine, the concept shown in Figure 1 is used. A total of 720 degrees of crankshaft rotation (two complete revolutions) are required to complete the four piston strokes of intake, compression, power, and exhaust. The actual duration in crankshaft degrees for each stroke is controlled by both the opening and closing of the intake and exhaust valves by the camshaft and will vary among makes and models of engines.

In Figure 1 the engine crankshaft is rotating in a clockwise direction when viewed from the front of the engine. During both the intake and the power strokes, the piston moves down the cylinder, while on both the...

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This section contains 4,690 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Diesel Cycle Engines Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Encyclopedia of Energy
Diesel Cycle Engines from Macmillan Encyclopedia of Energy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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