Darwinism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 34 pages of information about Darwinism.
This section contains 10,184 words
(approx. 34 pages at 300 words per page)
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Darwin's Theory

The Fact of Evolution

Darwin freely admitted that we do not directly observe the process of evolution. The time needed even for the origin in nature of a new variety is far too long. Consequently, the case for the occurrence of evolution is simply the same as the case for its scope and mechanism, and Darwin did not have access to direct evidence for the efficacy of natural selection—a gap that was not filled until the twentieth century. Darwin argued that life is too short for direct evidence but that certain facts force the conclusion upon us that there must be evolution; and if we adopt the hypothesis, a wide range of hitherto unconnected facts may be given a uniform explanation.

The Mechanisms of Evolution

Natural Selection

In the Origin Darwin placed the greatest weight on evolution by natural selection. It operates in conjunction with...

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This section contains 10,184 words
(approx. 34 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Darwinism Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Darwinism from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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