Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 17┬ápages of information about Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772–1834).
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Philosophical Development

What can be very schematically called the first stage in Coleridge's philosophical development was a highly enthusiastic acceptance in 1794 of David Hartley's theory of association and the "necessitarianism" which that doctrine seemed to imply. Also at this time, after an intense study of John Locke and of William Godwin's Inquiry concerning Political Justice (1793), Coleridge became strongly inspired by the Enlightenment ideal of social perfectibility. So inspired was he that in December of that year, having had these enthusiasms reciprocated by Robert Southey, he left Cambridge without taking his degree. In January 1795 he lectured at Bristol on religion and politics and became preoccupied with Southey on the project of a pantisocracy, an ideal socialist community consisting of twelve young men and their wives, which was to be established on the banks of the Susquehanna. This project never really got under way; but its rather serious...

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This section contains 4,953 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Coleridge, Samuel Taylor (1772-1834) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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