Clarke, Samuel (1675-1729) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 18┬ápages of information about Clarke, Samuel (1675–1729).
This section contains 5,117 words
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The Attack Against Naturalism and the Defense of Natural Religion

Clarke's primary philosophical interests lay in theology, metaphysics, and, to a lesser degree, ethics. His philosophical vocabulary and some of his metaphysical ideas were influenced by Descartes, whom he followed in holding that the world contains two types of substance, mind and matter, the combination of which constitutes humans. However, he sided with Nicolas Malebranche and Locke in denying that introspection lets one reach the substance of the soul. Indeed, like Locke and Newton, he held that one just does not know the substance of things. Furthermore, Clarke's overall judgment of Descartes was critical. He shared the view expressed by Henry More, Blaise Pascal, Pierre Bayle, and Leibniz that Descartes's system could be, and had been, used to further irreligion and had naturally developed into Spinozism. In particular, he believed that Descartes's identification of matter with extension...

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This section contains 5,117 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Clarke, Samuel (1675-1729) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Clarke, Samuel (1675-1729) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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