Cicero, Marcus Tullius (106-43 Bce) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Anthony Everitt
This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 6┬ápages of information about Cicero, Marcus Tullius (106–43 Bce).
This section contains 1,625 words
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Philosophy and Rhetoric

Whatever originality Cicero's views possess is not in their components (he believed that the Greeks had already exhausted the varieties of possible opinions) but in their combination. The most conspicuous feature of his thought is the union of philosophy with rhetoric. This union carries with it some criticism of Socrates, who was blamed for their separation (see De Oratore iii, 61), and appears to align Cicero with Isocrates rather than Plato; yet he does not consider the union incompatible with Platonism. Carneades had prepared the way for a reconciliation between rhetoric and the Academy when he made philosophy a contest between opinions, and Greek theoretical rhetoricians had long since sought to implement Plato's prescription in the Phaedrus for a scientific rhetoric. Cicero could also point to the literary excellence of the dialogues as evidence that Plato was a master of the rhetorical art...

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This section contains 1,625 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Cicero, Marcus Tullius (106-43 Bce) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Cicero, Marcus Tullius (106-43 Bce) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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