Cherokees - Research Article from Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 22 pages of information about Cherokees.
This section contains 6,543 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
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Cherokees

Overview

History

The word Cherokee is believed to have evolved from a Choctaw word meaning "Cave People." It was picked up and used by Europeans and eventually accepted and adopted by Cherokees in the form of Tsalagi or Jalagi. Traditionally, the people now known as Cherokee refer to themselves as aniyun-wiya, a name usually translated as "the Real People," sometimes "the Original People." Earliest historical data locates the Cherokees in a vast area of what is now the southeastern United States, with about 200 towns scattered throughout the present states of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. Cherokee oral tradition tells of a time when the Cherokees were ruled over by a powerful priesthood called the ani-Kutani. When the priests took away a young man's wife, he organized a revolt and all the priests were killed. Since then, according to the tale, the Cherokees...

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This section contains 6,543 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Cherokees Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America
Cherokees from Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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