Casuistry - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religion

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 8 pages of information about Casuistry.
This section contains 2,295 words
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Casuistry

CASUISTRY. Moral knowledge comprises general principles and propositions: for example, "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you," "Honest persons do not lie or steal," and so forth. However, moral knowledge also bears on choices to act in specific ways in unique situations. Thus, general principles must be transformed into particular choices: "I should not make this offensive remark about him because I would not want him to say such a thing about me in the hearing of those people," "I could not consider myself honest if I told her she was capable enough to deserve promotion," and so forth. Casuistry is concerned with the transition from general moral knowledge to particular moral choices. It can be defined as "the technique of reasoning whereby expert opinion is formulated concerning the existence and stringency of particular obligations...

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This section contains 2,295 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Casuistry Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan
Casuistry from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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