Brentano, Franz (1838-1917) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 13┬ápages of information about Brentano, Franz (1838–1917).
This section contains 3,656 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Brentano, Franz (1838-1917) Encyclopedia Article

Objects of Mental Phenomena

Brentano took the mental to comprise such phenomena as hearing, seeing, sensing, thinking, judging, inferring, loving, and hating. He held that what is common to mental phenomena and what distinguishes them from the physical is "intentional inexistence," which he also described as "reference to a content" and "direction upon an object." Mental phenomena, he said, may be defined as phenomena that "include an object intentionally within themselves." He did not mean to imply, however, that when, for example, a person thinks of a horse, there is a duplicate of the horse, a mental simulacrum, existing within the mind. The essential point, as he later emphasized, is that a person could think of a horse even if there were no horse. In the second edition of the Psychologie, he contrasted strict relations with mental relations. A and B cannot be related in the strict...

(read more)

This section contains 3,656 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Brentano, Franz (1838-1917) Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Brentano, Franz (1838-1917) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook