Bradley, Francis Herbert (1846-1924) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 15┬ápages of information about Bradley, Francis Herbert (1846–1924).
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Ethics

Bradley's Ethical Studies is the most Hegelian of his writings. There is much criticism in it of Mill and some criticism of Immanuel Kant. There are amusing skirmishes with Matthew Arnold and with Frederick Harrison, the English positivist. Running through the book is the idea that it is not for the moral philosopher to tell people what to do, but rather to dispel false views of the nature of morality and to provide an analysis of morality that can stand up to philosophical criticism. Thus he starts with an analysis of the moral concepts of the plain man, which, he holds, are not consistent with utilitarian views on punishment and responsibility. He goes on to criticize hedonism, largely on the ground that since pleasure is an "infinite perishing series," it cannot be the object of a rational pursuit. (The influence of Hegel's doctrine of the...

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This section contains 4,291 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Bradley, Francis Herbert (1846-1924) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Bradley, Francis Herbert (1846-1924) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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