Biophilia - Research Article from Environmental Encyclopedia

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 2 pages of information about Biophilia.
This section contains 517 words
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The term biophilia was coined by the American biologist, Edward O. Wilson (1929–), to mean "the innate tendency [of human beings] to focus on life and lifelike processes" and "connections that human beings subconsciously seek with the rest of life." Wilson first used the word in 1979 in an article published in the New York Times Book Review, and then in 1984 he wrote a short book (157 pages) that explored the notion in more detail.

Clearly, humans have coexisted with other species throughout our evolutionary history. In Wilson's view, this relationship has resulted in humans developing an innate, genetically based, or "hard-wired" need to be close to other species and to be empathetic to their needs. The presumed relationship is reciprocal, meaning other animals are also to varying degrees empathetic with the needs of humans. The biophilia hypothesis seems intuitively reasonable, although it is likely impossible that it could ever be...

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This section contains 517 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Biophilia Encyclopedia Article
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Gale
Biophilia from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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