Behaviorism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 2 pages of information about Behaviorism.
This section contains 590 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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Behaviorism

A theory of human development initiated by American educational psychologist Edward Thorndike, and developed by American psychologists John Watson and B.F. Skinner.

Behaviorism is a psychological theory of human development that posits that humans can be trained, or conditioned, to respond in specific ways to specific stimuli and that given the correct stimuli, personalities and behaviors of individuals, and even entire civilizations, can be codified and controlled.

Edward Thorndike (1874-1949) initially proposed that humans and animals acquire behaviors through the association of stimuli and responses. He advanced two laws of learning to explain why behaviors occur the way they do: The Law of Effect specifies that any time a behavior is followed by a pleasant outcome, that behavior is likely to recur. The Law of Exercise states that the more a stimulus is connected with a response, the stronger the link between the two. Ivan Pavlov's (1849-...

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This section contains 590 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Behaviorism Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence
Behaviorism from Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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