Behaviorism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 19 pages of information about Behaviorism.
This section contains 5,597 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
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Behaviorism

Traditional notions of the mind have tended to treat mental states as "private" and "subjective," not accessible to the public and objective methods of science. With the failure of an "introspectionist" psychology in the early twentieth century, the only recourse seemed to be either to deny that mental states had any role to play in any serious science, or to try to find a way to understand talk of mental states that was entirely objective. The first option is called the "eliminativist" strategy, and Radical behaviorism was a monumental effort to realize it. The eliminativist strategy proposed to explain all human and animal behavior in terms of physically specified stimuli, responses, and reinforcements. It is to be distinguished from the second, "reductionist" strategy, which attempts not to eliminate mental phenomena, but rather to save mental phenomena by identifying them with some or other existing physical phenomena. Analytical behaviorism...

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This section contains 5,597 words
(approx. 19 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Behaviorism Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Behaviorism from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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