Australian and New Zealand Perspectives - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics

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Historical Background

Australia and New Zealand had very different traditional cultures. Australian aborigines can demonstrate a continuous hunter-gatherer occupation of 40,000 years; in contrast, the Maori reached New Zealand as recently as 1000 to 1200 C.E., bringing with them a distinctive Polynesian cultural tradition. Australia became a British colony in the late eighteenth century, and New Zealand in the mid-nineteenth century. Invasion and settlement brought European religious and moral doctrines and European technologies designed to dominate the indigenous populations and exploit the natural environment.

Unfortunately, the colonists of both countries disdained indigenous knowledge and technologies. Only in the last quarter of the twentieth century did political activism lead to a broader appreciation of the depth of indigenous cultural and spiritual links with the land. There is increasing recognition that these values enrich the societies as a whole and in particular suggest important approaches to the search for...

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This section contains 2,169 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Australian and New Zealand Perspectives Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics
Australian and New Zealand Perspectives from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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