Atlantis, Old and New - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics

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The story of Atlantis was invented by Plato in an unfinished sequel to the Republic constituted by the Timaeus and the Critias. These two dialogues attempt to relate the political philosophy of the Republic, the argument of which is reviewed at the beginning to the Timaeus, to natural philosophy. The Timaeus describes a prehistorically virtuous Athens, embodying the natural harmonies argued in the Republic, that defeats attack from the unlawful empire of Atlantis, once located in the Atlantic Ocean beyond the Iberian peninsula and the North African coast. In defeat it sinks into the ocean. As Critias describes Atlantis, it was rich in both natural resources and technical developments—indeed, its technological works are described as "incredible" (Critias 118c) canals, fortifications, and palaces—but lacking in wisdom. With this story Plato raises questions about relationships between science and technology as well as...

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This section contains 1,474 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Atlantis, Old and New Encyclopedia Article
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Atlantis, Old and New from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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