Afterlife - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religion

Billy Collins
This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 151 pages of information about Afterlife.
This section contains 3,310 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
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Greece

Funerary Rituals

Children and other surviving kin were expected to ensure that the dead received proper funerary rites; if they did not, the deceased could not be considered truly dead and its soul might wander restlessly between the upper world and the underworld. What constituted "proper rites" varied from place to place and time to time, but honorable disposal of the corpse by burial or cremation was the very least that was required, lest the corpse otherwise become prey for scavengers. Even symbolic burial, such as Antigone performed for her brother by sprinkling dust over his body, would suffice (Sophocles, Antigone 254–255). If a body were irretrievable, rites might be performed for the deceased anyway, in hopes that the soul would find rest (e.g., Odyssey 1.290–292). People who turned up alive after having had such rites performed were called "double-fated" (deuteropotmoi) and had to...

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This section contains 3,310 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Afterlife Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Religion
Afterlife from Encyclopedia of Religion. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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