Afterlife - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religion

Billy Collins
This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 151 pages of information about Afterlife.
This section contains 2,338 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
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The Halls of the Dead

The largest and most complete mythological narratives discussing the afterlife are contained in the Prose Edda and the Poetic Edda. The Prose Edda was written by Snorri Sturluson (1179–1241), a politically involved Icelandic nobleman who lived roughly two centuries after the conversion of Iceland to Christianity. Snorri presents a logical and clear description of many Norse beliefs, but this well-ordered narrative most likely reflects the influence of Christian systematic theology. His sources, mainly the group of poems called the Poetic Edda, present a much more fractured and inconsistent view of the afterlife. Germanic paganism apparently allowed multiple and contradictory understandings of death.

As portrayed in the Prose Edda, the dead dwelt in various halls. The virtuous deceased went to Gimlé, called simply the best house; to Brimir, which featured a copious supply of ale; or to Sindri, which was made of...

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This section contains 2,338 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Afterlife Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Religion
Afterlife from Encyclopedia of Religion. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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