Afterlife - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religion

Billy Collins
This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 151 pages of information about Afterlife.
This section contains 2,338 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
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Afterlife: Germanic Concepts

The Old Norse accounts that supply most of the detailed information about pre-Christian Germanic religion picture several different kinds of afterlife. These can be simplified into two contrasting general concepts of life after death. In one view, the dead traveled to one of several halls depending upon how they died. In the other view, the dead remained very much on earth, either staying in their grave mound or else traveling out and disturbing their former neighborhood. In both understandings of the afterlife, how one died and the rituals surrounding death could determine how the dead person fared in the afterlife.

The Halls of the Dead

The largest and most complete mythological narratives discussing the afterlife are contained in the Prose Edda and the Poetic Edda. The Prose Edda was written by Snorri Sturluson (1179–1241), a politically involved Icelandic nobleman who lived roughly two centuries after...

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This section contains 2,338 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Afterlife Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Religion
Afterlife from Encyclopedia of Religion. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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