Addams, Jane - Research Article from Americans at War

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Addams, Jane.
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(b. September 6, 1860; d. May 21, 1935) Reformer, advocate for peace and social justice, lecturer, and writer.

Jane Addams began her public career in 1889 as the co-founder and leader of the Chicago social settlement Hull-House. Between 1890 and 1914, Addams and Hull-House led the settlement movement then at the forefront of progressive social reforms sweeping America, including the abolition of child labor and sweat shops, immigrant protection and education, and woman suffrage. During World War I, Jane Addams became an organizer and the principal advocate of the modern American woman's peace movement. From that position, both during and after World War I, she helped build and direct an international coalition of women peace advocates representing countries from most of the continents. For her efforts, she became the first American woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize (1931).

Addams was educated in her small Cedarville, Illinois community, and at Rockford Female Seminary. Having...

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This section contains 923 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Addams, Jane Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan
Addams, Jane from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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