The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays

What metaphors are used in The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus?

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In Return to Tipasa, Camus recounts a trip he made back to his hometown. For Camus, Tipasa represents his lost innocence which existed prior to any moral code or complex philosophy, which innocence was lost definitively during the war. He returned once to Tipasa, immediately after the war, but was unable to rediscover what he had lost. After fifteen years and much contemplation, he realized the value of what he had lost. By losing that keen perception of beauty that he had enjoyed while a young man in Tipasa, he also lost the ability to effectively fight for justice, since beauty and justice, while not the same, are mutually dependent upon one another. When he finally returns at the age of forty, he is able to find once more that beauty he lost and glimpse the innocence which was ripped away by war. His experience is, in a way, a metaphor for Europe's loss of innocence and a call for it to throw away the philosophies which emphasize only justice and forget beauty.

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The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays