Mourning Becomes Electra

How does Eugene O'Neill use imagery in Mourning Becomes Electra?

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O'Neill's island imagery of prenatal union is fully developed in the description of Christine's relationship with her son Orin. Christine reminisces with Orin after his homecoming: "We had a secret little world of our own in the old days, didn't we? which no one but us knew about" (The Hunted, II). She claims that Ezra hated his son because he knew that she loved the boy better than anything else in the world (The Hunted, II). The exclusion is something Ezra himself attested to: "You had turned to your new baby, Orin. I was hardly alive for you any more. I saw that" (Homecoming, III). But the original union is broken; mother and son have been separated. Orin's father took him away to a war, and he blames his mother now for the scarcity and coolness of her letters during his absence (TheHunted , II).

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Mourning Becomes Electra