Zorba the Greek Test | Mid-Book Test - Medium

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This test consists of 5 multiple choice questions, 5 short answer questions, and 10 short essay questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. With what does the narrator compare his lustful feelings for the widow to?
(a) Walking on the beach at night.
(b) Not ever finding any lignite in the mine.
(c) The temptation of Buddha by the Evil One.
(d) The widow's garden.

2. Who takes charge when the work begins in the mine?
(a) A soldier.
(b) The narrator.
(c) The narrator's grandfather.
(d) Zorba.

3. What is the ultimate physical experience for Zorba?
(a) Playing a musical instrument.
(b) Going to war.
(c) Mining.
(d) Sex.

4. In Chapter 4, what does the narrator do when he first awakens?
(a) Has coffee with Zorba.
(b) Goes straight to work.
(c) Smokes a pipe.
(d) Goes jogging.

5. Zorba tells the story of an old man who will what?
(a) Never die.
(b) Cook a delicious soup.
(c) Play a musical instrument when happy.
(d) Never leave Crete.

Short Answer Questions

1. In Chapter 13, Zorba demonstrates his dedication to what?

2. What is one of the narrator's goals at the end of Chapter 4?

3. What does the narrator's manuscript become for him?

4. In Chapter 11, what does the narrator do when he sees the widow?

5. What act has Zorba performed that symbolizes the connection between freedom and manliness?

Short Essay Questions

1. What reasons does Zorba give in Chapter 9 for so intensely wanting the narrator to go and sleep with the widow?

2. Describe the narrator's memory of his old friend while on their visit to the museum.

3. How does the narrator reveal that he is like his grandfather?

4. What does Zorba's version of God look like?

5. How does the narrator describe Zorba the first time he sees him dancing?

6. What kinds of responsibilities does Zorba take on at the initiation of his friendship with the narrator.

7. Describe the narrator's counter argument to Zorba's connection between manliness and freedom regarding his missing finger?

8. How might Madame Hortense's romantic history challenge Zorba's concept of his own manliness?

9. What does Karayannis's letter from Africa remind the narrator that he has always wanted to do?

10. Describe Zorba's categories of marriage and how many of each he's experienced.

Multiple Choice Answer Key

1. C
2. D
3. D
4. C
5. A

Short Answer Key

1. In Chapter 13, Zorba demonstrates his dedication to what?

His immediate passions.

2. What is one of the narrator's goals at the end of Chapter 4?

He wants to forget about Buddha.

3. What does the narrator's manuscript become for him?

A war-like attempt to completely remove the prophet from his soul.

4. In Chapter 11, what does the narrator do when he sees the widow?

Nothing. He is unable to approach her.

5. What act has Zorba performed that symbolizes the connection between freedom and manliness?

He cut part of his finger off because it got in the way of his pottery.

Short Essay Answer Key

1. What reasons does Zorba give in Chapter 9 for so intensely wanting the narrator to go and sleep with the widow?

He says that women need men to sleep with them and protect them; that it is a part of a greater plan. He says she will be ruined if a man does not go and sleep with her. He also says that not taking the opportunity to sleep with her is one sin that God will not forgive.

2. Describe the narrator's memory of his old friend while on their visit to the museum.

The narrator's old friend told him of his love for a painting by Rembrandt; a painting he says he will owe his greatest accomplishments to. As they are leaving the museum, they see a bird land on a statue of an Amazon and begin singing. The narrator asks what it might mean, and the friend recites a few lines that encourage the narrator not to bother himself with such thoughts.

3. How does the narrator reveal that he is like his grandfather?

He remembers his grandfather demanding that guests tell him their personal stories of adventure so that he could experience the thrill through their stories. This is similar to the narrator in that the adventures for both occur removed from the action and inside the head and ideas of the two.

4. What does Zorba's version of God look like?

Zorba claims to be an atheist, but he does tell the narrator that God is likely a more outrageous version of himself for whom forgiveness is not difficult, and who does not want to be worshiped.

5. How does the narrator describe Zorba the first time he sees him dancing?

The narrator says Zorba looks like he is wearing rubber shoes. He also says that Zorba's soul looks like it is trying to fling his body like a meteor into the darkness.

6. What kinds of responsibilities does Zorba take on at the initiation of his friendship with the narrator.

Zorba agrees to act as foreman of the lignite mine. He also promises to cook the narrator soup and play him music on his santuri.

7. Describe the narrator's counter argument to Zorba's connection between manliness and freedom regarding his missing finger?

The narrator argues that although such passions are admirable, they could also possibly lead to the desire to remove more crucial body parts. He suggests that Zorba might eventually want to remove his sexual organs, which would have a much more life-altering and drastic result.

8. How might Madame Hortense's romantic history challenge Zorba's concept of his own manliness?

Zorba believes in living for the day and that any impediment to freedom and manliness should be removed. Because he thinks sexual relationships are the ultimate in the physical life, he is helpless against the force of her own history. She has been romanced by legendary and powerful men, and Zorba cannot do anything to remove them as competitive forces from his own life. He offers to take on Canavaro's role in her life, but he has no power or awareness of how to actually fulfill that role.

9. What does Karayannis's letter from Africa remind the narrator that he has always wanted to do?

He has a desire to see and touch as much of the world as he possibly can before he dies.

10. Describe Zorba's categories of marriage and how many of each he's experienced.

Zorba says he's been married "honestly," "half-honestly," and "dishonestly." He says that he's been married "honestly" or legally only once. He says that he's been "half-honestly" married, or in relationships similar to marriage that were not made formal and legal with a wedding, two times. He says that he's been "dishonestly" married a thousand times, and by this he is referring to every sexual encounter he's ever had.

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