Zorba the Greek Test | Mid-Book Test - Medium

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This test consists of 5 multiple choice questions, 5 short answer questions, and 10 short essay questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. How does the narrator end the letter to his friend in Chapter 8?
(a) He suggests they not see one another again.
(b) He reveals his plans for the mine.
(c) He tells him that he has love for him.
(d) He tells him that he wishes he too were at war.

2. What are Zorba's beliefs about the existence of God?
(a) He looks to Anagnosti for all of his religious questions and shares his beliefs.
(b) He is a Christian.
(c) He does not personally believe in God but believes religion is essential to civilization.
(d) He believes in a higher power but not in religion.

3. What does Zorba indicate would be the worst thing the narrator could do to Anagnosti?
(a) Cast down his religion.
(b) Leave his celebration.
(c) Hire him at the mine.
(d) Kill his children.

4. What does Zorba promise the narrator upon the initiation of their friendship?
(a) He promises to do all of his cooking and cleaning.
(b) He promises to make him a fortune.
(c) He promises to cook him soup and play him music.
(d) He promises to find him a wife.

5. Who does the narrator hire to help him mine lignite on the island?
(a) Santuri.
(b) Zorba.
(c) His best friend.
(d) Crete.

Short Answer Questions

1. What or who does Zorba live for?

2. Who is the second person to offer the narrator and Zorba lodging in Crete?

3. What act has Zorba performed that symbolizes the connection between freedom and manliness?

4. While Zorba and the narrator are in the shop, who runs past the window?

5. What incident on the beach mellows the narrator's restlessness?

Short Essay Questions

1. Describe the narrator's counter argument to Zorba's connection between manliness and freedom regarding his missing finger?

2. How does Zorba's version of the devil living inside him compare to Zorba himself?

3. Describe the first time that the narrator sees the widow.

4. How does the narrator describe Zorba the first time he sees him dancing?

5. In Chapter 3, how are the relationships between men and women on Crete exhibited?

6. How does the narrator's memory of the butterfly impact his feelings about approaching the widow?

7. What does Karayannis's letter from Africa remind the narrator that he has always wanted to do?

8. When the narrator observes Zorba's ease with problem solving in Chapter 5, what figures come into his mind?

9. What does Zorba do while in Candia?

10. Do you think the narrator has actually lost all interest and faith in poetry as he claims in Chapter 12? How so?

Multiple Choice Answer Key

1. C
2. C
3. A
4. C
5. B

Short Answer Key

1. What or who does Zorba live for?

Man as individual.

2. Who is the second person to offer the narrator and Zorba lodging in Crete?

The village elder.

3. What act has Zorba performed that symbolizes the connection between freedom and manliness?

He cut part of his finger off because it got in the way of his pottery.

4. While Zorba and the narrator are in the shop, who runs past the window?

A beautiful widow.

5. What incident on the beach mellows the narrator's restlessness?

He accidentally kills a butterfly.

Short Essay Answer Key

1. Describe the narrator's counter argument to Zorba's connection between manliness and freedom regarding his missing finger?

The narrator argues that although such passions are admirable, they could also possibly lead to the desire to remove more crucial body parts. He suggests that Zorba might eventually want to remove his sexual organs, which would have a much more life-altering and drastic result.

2. How does Zorba's version of the devil living inside him compare to Zorba himself?

Zorba says that the devil is a mirror image of himself. The only difference is that the devil refuses to grow old. He also wears a red carnation behind his ear.

3. Describe the first time that the narrator sees the widow.

The narrator and Zorba duck into a cafe in the middle of a rainstorm, and from here, they see the widow run past the window. The narrator immediately finds her beautiful, although there are a variety of responses to her presence, not all of them positive. Soon after, Mimiko enters and reports that the widow has lost her sheep and offers a reward to anyone who can help return it to her.

4. How does the narrator describe Zorba the first time he sees him dancing?

The narrator says Zorba looks like he is wearing rubber shoes. He also says that Zorba's soul looks like it is trying to fling his body like a meteor into the darkness.

5. In Chapter 3, how are the relationships between men and women on Crete exhibited?

In the beginning of the chapter, the narrator's encounter with the young women in the country exhibits the historical impact of war and violence on the male/female relationship. They are immediately frightened of him as a stranger, and so their encounter is stunted. Mavrandoni's offer to let the men stay in his house to avoid the scandal of staying with a woman also exhibits a level of division and acceptable interaction between men and women.

6. How does the narrator's memory of the butterfly impact his feelings about approaching the widow?

The narrator had attempted to help the butterfly emerge from the cocoon by blowing warm air on it. Doing this made the butterfly emerge too quickly and die. The narrator realizes while meditating on this memory, that an individual must "confidently obey the eternal rhythm." He knows, in turn, that he can't speed his relationship with the widow and must let it unfold naturally.

7. What does Karayannis's letter from Africa remind the narrator that he has always wanted to do?

He has a desire to see and touch as much of the world as he possibly can before he dies.

8. When the narrator observes Zorba's ease with problem solving in Chapter 5, what figures come into his mind?

The narrator realizes that Zorba's mind is not stressed with education and that his problem solving is a result of his connection with the physical world. He compares Zorba to Alexander the Great cutting through the Gordian knot with his sword. His notes that it is difficult to miss with feet planted firmly and held by the weight of the entire body. This leads him to compare Zorba to the serpent worshiped by Africans. He notes that anything so connected with and touching the earth constantly must be superior in its understanding of the earth's workings.

9. What does Zorba do while in Candia?

He meets a young girl with whom he has an affair. He also spends all of the boss's money.

10. Do you think the narrator has actually lost all interest and faith in poetry as he claims in Chapter 12? How so?

No. When the narrator says of the Buddha, "I must mobilize words and their necromantic power...invoke magic rhythms; lay siege to him, cast a spell over him and drive him out of my entrails! I must throw over him the net of images, catch him and free myself!" he demonstrates a transformation in the way he sees poetry. He sees it less as contemplation and more as a physical act of using language. His use of the craft has changed, but it is untrue that he no longer has use for it as he so claims.

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