Zorba the Greek Test | Mid-Book Test - Medium

This set of Lesson Plans consists of approximately 156 pages of tests, essay questions, lessons, and other teaching materials.
Name: _________________________ Period: ___________________

This test consists of 5 multiple choice questions, 5 short answer questions, and 10 short essay questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. With whom does Zorba begin a romance?
(a) A young widowed mother.
(b) Dame Hortense.
(c) A strange woman walking on the beach.
(d) A nun.

2. How did Zorba temporarily keep track of his sexual relationships?
(a) He asked his mother to remember his list of lovers.
(b) He carved notches in the side of a boat.
(c) He cut off a lock of each lover's hair.
(d) He recorded the names of the women in a small book.

3. What is Zorba's response when the narrator asks him how many times he has been married?
(a) Three times.
(b) Once honestly and twice half-honestly.
(c) Four times.
(d) Twice honestly and once half-honestly.

4. What does the narrator request of Zorba when he remains in Candia for longer than expected?
(a) He asks that he never return.
(b) He requests that he double the supplies purchase.
(c) He asks that he bring food when he returns.
(d) He requests that he return immediately.

5. Why does Zorba tell the narrator not to preach equality of the sexes?
(a) He says it is all lies anyway.
(b) He says that Anagnosti will kill him if he does.
(c) He says that the people of Crete believe in equality of the sexes already.
(d) He says it will disrupt the island's way of life without offering solutions for making it better.

Short Answer Questions

1. What does Zorba tell the narrator he should have done before going to bed the night before in chapter 4?

2. In a letter to his friend, what does the narrator say his friend inspired him to do?

3. The narrator warn Zorba that such passions may lead to the removal of what body part?

4. What happens at the celebration in Chapter 5?

5. With whom do the narrator and Zorba enjoy Christmas Eve dinner?

Short Essay Questions

1. Describe the first time that the narrator sees the widow.

2. How does the narrator describe Zorba the first time he sees him dancing?

3. How does the narrator's memory of the butterfly impact his feelings about approaching the widow?

4. Why is the narrator going to Crete?

5. How might Madame Hortense's romantic history challenge Zorba's concept of his own manliness?

6. Do you think Zorba's description of dance as a language is accurate? In other words, does the narrator understand what Zorba means by his erratic dancing?

7. What reasons does Zorba give in Chapter 9 for so intensely wanting the narrator to go and sleep with the widow?

8. How does the fact that Zorba is missing half of his finger relate to his connection between manliness and freedom?

9. Describe the narrator's relationship with his old friend.

10. When the narrator makes an attempt to get to know some of the mine workers, he begins to discuss socialism with them. Zorba does not like this. What are his reasons?

Multiple Choice Answer Key

1. B
2. C
3. B
4. D
5. D

Short Answer Key

1. What does Zorba tell the narrator he should have done before going to bed the night before in chapter 4?

He says the narrator should have told Dame Hortense how beautiful she is.

2. In a letter to his friend, what does the narrator say his friend inspired him to do?

Pursue a life of physical action.

3. The narrator warn Zorba that such passions may lead to the removal of what body part?

The sexual organs.

4. What happens at the celebration in Chapter 5?

The castration of pigs.

5. With whom do the narrator and Zorba enjoy Christmas Eve dinner?

Madame Hortense.

Short Essay Answer Key

1. Describe the first time that the narrator sees the widow.

The narrator and Zorba duck into a cafe in the middle of a rainstorm, and from here, they see the widow run past the window. The narrator immediately finds her beautiful, although there are a variety of responses to her presence, not all of them positive. Soon after, Mimiko enters and reports that the widow has lost her sheep and offers a reward to anyone who can help return it to her.

2. How does the narrator describe Zorba the first time he sees him dancing?

The narrator says Zorba looks like he is wearing rubber shoes. He also says that Zorba's soul looks like it is trying to fling his body like a meteor into the darkness.

3. How does the narrator's memory of the butterfly impact his feelings about approaching the widow?

The narrator had attempted to help the butterfly emerge from the cocoon by blowing warm air on it. Doing this made the butterfly emerge too quickly and die. The narrator realizes while meditating on this memory, that an individual must "confidently obey the eternal rhythm." He knows, in turn, that he can't speed his relationship with the widow and must let it unfold naturally.

4. Why is the narrator going to Crete?

The narrator is curious about the adventurous life his friend preached to him. He is going to Crete to experiment with such a life by renting a lignite mine and thus engaging more with the physical world. His overall goal in these actions is to find freedom through a marriage of the mind and body.

5. How might Madame Hortense's romantic history challenge Zorba's concept of his own manliness?

Zorba believes in living for the day and that any impediment to freedom and manliness should be removed. Because he thinks sexual relationships are the ultimate in the physical life, he is helpless against the force of her own history. She has been romanced by legendary and powerful men, and Zorba cannot do anything to remove them as competitive forces from his own life. He offers to take on Canavaro's role in her life, but he has no power or awareness of how to actually fulfill that role.

6. Do you think Zorba's description of dance as a language is accurate? In other words, does the narrator understand what Zorba means by his erratic dancing?

Zorba says that he had so much joy that he had to let it out somehow and dancing was the best way to let the explosion loose. The dancing reminds the narrator of a story he made up about how his grandfather died. He told friends that the old man bounced on rubber shoes until he disappeared into the clouds. This does exhibit some understanding. The narrator associates the dancing with a great release of energy although he cannot clearly name it.

7. What reasons does Zorba give in Chapter 9 for so intensely wanting the narrator to go and sleep with the widow?

He says that women need men to sleep with them and protect them; that it is a part of a greater plan. He says she will be ruined if a man does not go and sleep with her. He also says that not taking the opportunity to sleep with her is one sin that God will not forgive.

8. How does the fact that Zorba is missing half of his finger relate to his connection between manliness and freedom?

Zorba says that he cut part of his finger off because it got in the way of making pottery. He argues that anything that gets in the way of man doing what he wants should be removed. Because it takes a great deal of physical and mental courage to remove a body part, the connection for Zorba is strong.

9. Describe the narrator's relationship with his old friend.

The narrator and his friend have a deep connection and love for one another. However, the connection is largely unspoken as the two men often argue rather than express emotion to one another. The soldier friend is more of an adventurer than the narrator, and often teases the narrator for being such a bookworm. The two men contrast one another; the narrator is more of a philosopher who is focused on a higher power, while the friend is a soldier who believes in living his life for his fellow man and his nation. The connection between the two men, despite their differences, is clear in their agreement to send mental messages to one another if they sense danger. This obviously indicates that they believe strongly in their connection and friendship.

10. When the narrator makes an attempt to get to know some of the mine workers, he begins to discuss socialism with them. Zorba does not like this. What are his reasons?

Zorba believes that supervising a workforce requires complete authority. He thinks it's better if they believe they have fewer rights and that workers who feel like they are equal to their bosses will eventually take rights away from their bosses.

This section contains 1,211 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Copyrights
BookRags
Zorba the Greek from BookRags. (c)2017 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook