Zorba the Greek Test | Mid-Book Test - Medium

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This test consists of 5 multiple choice questions, 5 short answer questions, and 10 short essay questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. About what does Zorba confront the miners?
(a) Leaving lanterns lit inside.
(b) Not following the proper safety procedures.
(c) Failing to get their picks before exiting.
(d) Taking long lunch breaks.

2. What does Zorba do when he hears his boss talking to the workmen?
(a) He asks his boss to record the men's work hours.
(b) He asks his boss to get them lunch.
(c) He throws his boss out of the mine.
(d) He tells his boss that they are lazy.

3. What does Zorba indicate would be the worst thing the narrator could do to Anagnosti?
(a) Kill his children.
(b) Hire him at the mine.
(c) Leave his celebration.
(d) Cast down his religion.

4. What does Zorba's gift prompt Madame Hortense to do?
(a) Talk about her love affairs.
(b) Profess her love for Zorba.
(c) Leave the room.
(d) Start crying.

5. Why does Zorba say he removed the body part?
(a) It was strangely colored.
(b) It was too big.
(c) It got in the way of his pottery.
(d) It hurt constantly.

Short Answer Questions

1. What or who does the narrator's long-time friend live for?

2. Zorba tells the narrator stories about the island. What kind of events does he describe?

3. What does the narrator do when Zorba displays frustration with the miners?

4. Why does Zorba tell the narrator not to preach equality of the sexes?

5. What does Zorba tell the narrator he should have done before going to bed the night before in chapter 4?

Short Essay Questions

1. When the narrator makes an attempt to get to know some of the mine workers, he begins to discuss socialism with them. Zorba does not like this. What are his reasons?

2. Describe Zorba's categories of marriage and how many of each he's experienced.

3. What is Zorba's account of God's creation of woman?

4. Describe the narrator's relationship with his old friend.

5. Explain the parrot's role in the life of Madame Hortense and her guests.

6. Do you think Zorba's description of dance as a language is accurate? In other words, does the narrator understand what Zorba means by his erratic dancing?

7. What feelings does Zorba express about religion?

8. At the conclusion of Chapter 2, do you think Zorba or the narrator has a more realistic outlook on how to live life?

9. Describe Zorba's only account of his heart being broken.

10. Why is the narrator going to Crete?

Multiple Choice Answer Key

1. C
2. C
3. D
4. A
5. C

Short Answer Key

1. What or who does the narrator's long-time friend live for?

Mankind.

2. Zorba tells the narrator stories about the island. What kind of events does he describe?

Wars and revolutions.

3. What does the narrator do when Zorba displays frustration with the miners?

He calls a lunch break.

4. Why does Zorba tell the narrator not to preach equality of the sexes?

He says it will disrupt the island's way of life without offering solutions for making it better.

5. What does Zorba tell the narrator he should have done before going to bed the night before in chapter 4?

He says the narrator should have told Dame Hortense how beautiful she is.

Short Essay Answer Key

1. When the narrator makes an attempt to get to know some of the mine workers, he begins to discuss socialism with them. Zorba does not like this. What are his reasons?

Zorba believes that supervising a workforce requires complete authority. He thinks it's better if they believe they have fewer rights and that workers who feel like they are equal to their bosses will eventually take rights away from their bosses.

2. Describe Zorba's categories of marriage and how many of each he's experienced.

Zorba says he's been married "honestly," "half-honestly," and "dishonestly." He says that he's been married "honestly" or legally only once. He says that he's been "half-honestly" married, or in relationships similar to marriage that were not made formal and legal with a wedding, two times. He says that he's been "dishonestly" married a thousand times, and by this he is referring to every sexual encounter he's ever had.

3. What is Zorba's account of God's creation of woman?

Zorba says that when God removed the rib from Adam, the devil turned into a snake and snatched the rib and ran off with it. God then chased the devil and caught him, but the devil ultimately got away while God was left holding only his horns. God then made woman out of the devil's horns rather than the rib of Adam.

4. Describe the narrator's relationship with his old friend.

The narrator and his friend have a deep connection and love for one another. However, the connection is largely unspoken as the two men often argue rather than express emotion to one another. The soldier friend is more of an adventurer than the narrator, and often teases the narrator for being such a bookworm. The two men contrast one another; the narrator is more of a philosopher who is focused on a higher power, while the friend is a soldier who believes in living his life for his fellow man and his nation. The connection between the two men, despite their differences, is clear in their agreement to send mental messages to one another if they sense danger. This obviously indicates that they believe strongly in their connection and friendship.

5. Explain the parrot's role in the life of Madame Hortense and her guests.

Hortense's parrot is a constant reminder of Madame Hortense's greatest love. As a possession, it has been trained to say Canavaro's name repeatedly and therefore to challenge the immediacy of Zorba's manliness.

6. Do you think Zorba's description of dance as a language is accurate? In other words, does the narrator understand what Zorba means by his erratic dancing?

Zorba says that he had so much joy that he had to let it out somehow and dancing was the best way to let the explosion loose. The dancing reminds the narrator of a story he made up about how his grandfather died. He told friends that the old man bounced on rubber shoes until he disappeared into the clouds. This does exhibit some understanding. The narrator associates the dancing with a great release of energy although he cannot clearly name it.

7. What feelings does Zorba express about religion?

Zorba claims to be an atheist. However, when it comes to the other villagers, Zorba believes that religion is not only important but is the center of their way of life. He warns the narrator that speaking against religion to the villagers is not wise as it is better for them than having no organized structure at all.

8. At the conclusion of Chapter 2, do you think Zorba or the narrator has a more realistic outlook on how to live life?

I think that they have very different perspectives as distinct as two different languages. Zorba's outlook might be easier on a day-by-day basis as his doesn't require a lot of thinking through of various options and looks directly to instinct and passion. The narrator's perspective might be the more "realistic" however, in that it takes a much broader look at the many elements and their complex arrangements which come together to inform life.

9. Describe Zorba's only account of his heart being broken.

Zorba met a woman named Noussa ten days after leaving the village of his previous lover. Noussa invited him to her house for a feast at which Zorba gave a toast. After this, the lights went out and a massive orgy began. He lost Noussa in the midst of the orgy but found her the next day, and they remained together for 6 months. She then eloped with a soldier and broke Zorba's heart.

10. Why is the narrator going to Crete?

The narrator is curious about the adventurous life his friend preached to him. He is going to Crete to experiment with such a life by renting a lignite mine and thus engaging more with the physical world. His overall goal in these actions is to find freedom through a marriage of the mind and body.

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