Zorba the Greek Test | Mid-Book Test - Medium

This set of Lesson Plans consists of approximately 153 pages of tests, essay questions, lessons, and other teaching materials.
Name: _________________________ Period: ___________________

This test consists of 5 multiple choice questions, 5 short answer questions, and 10 short essay questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. What reason does the narrator give in his argument that Zorba should not pressure him to visit the widow?
(a) Acting impulsively is against his nature.
(b) He doesn't want to hurt the widow's feelings.
(c) Acting impulsively is his nature and he's trying to change.
(d) He needs to stay focused on his writing.

2. What are Zorba's beliefs about the existence of God?
(a) He looks to Anagnosti for all of his religious questions and shares his beliefs.
(b) He is a Christian.
(c) He believes in a higher power but not in religion.
(d) He does not personally believe in God but believes religion is essential to civilization.

3. Why does Zorba watch the widow's home?
(a) He wants to protect her from Mimiko.
(b) He wants to steal from her.
(c) He wants to make sure the narrator is not sneaking into her house.
(d) He wants to make sure she is not going to bed alone.

4. What does the narrator mostly do while Zorba works in the mine?
(a) He romances Madame Hortense.
(b) He swims in the ocean.
(c) He works on his writing.
(d) He also works in the mine.

5. While Zorba is away, who invites the narrator to visit Africa?
(a) Karayannis.
(b) His soldier friend.
(c) Zorba.
(d) The narrator's older brother.

Short Answer Questions

1. What or who does the narrator's long-time friend live for?

2. What is the ultimate physical experience for Zorba?

3. What does Zorba indicate would be the worst thing the narrator could do to Anagnosti?

4. What exclamation does the first chapter conclude with?

5. Why does Zorba begin to feel restless and depressed while in Candia?

Short Essay Questions

1. Do you think Zorba's description of dance as a language is accurate? In other words, does the narrator understand what Zorba means by his erratic dancing?

2. Describe the narrator's counter argument to Zorba's connection between manliness and freedom regarding his missing finger?

3. Describe the narrator's relationship with his old friend.

4. How might Madame Hortense's romantic history challenge Zorba's concept of his own manliness?

5. How does the narrator try to get the widow out of his mind at the beginning of Chapter 10?

6. When Zorba tells the story of the old man who will never die, what does this show about his own and the narrator's perspectives on life and death?

7. What does Zorba represent in the story?

8. Describe the narrator's memory of his old friend while on their visit to the museum.

9. When the narrator observes Zorba's ease with problem solving in Chapter 5, what figures come into his mind?

10. Describe what happened while Zorba was at war that changed his mind about judging a person based on nationality.

Multiple Choice Answer Key

1. A
2. D
3. D
4. C
5. A

Short Answer Key

1. What or who does the narrator's long-time friend live for?

Mankind.

2. What is the ultimate physical experience for Zorba?

Sex.

3. What does Zorba indicate would be the worst thing the narrator could do to Anagnosti?

Cast down his religion.

4. What exclamation does the first chapter conclude with?

"God and the Devil!"

5. Why does Zorba begin to feel restless and depressed while in Candia?

He realizes he's aging.

Short Essay Answer Key

1. Do you think Zorba's description of dance as a language is accurate? In other words, does the narrator understand what Zorba means by his erratic dancing?

Zorba says that he had so much joy that he had to let it out somehow and dancing was the best way to let the explosion loose. The dancing reminds the narrator of a story he made up about how his grandfather died. He told friends that the old man bounced on rubber shoes until he disappeared into the clouds. This does exhibit some understanding. The narrator associates the dancing with a great release of energy although he cannot clearly name it.

2. Describe the narrator's counter argument to Zorba's connection between manliness and freedom regarding his missing finger?

The narrator argues that although such passions are admirable, they could also possibly lead to the desire to remove more crucial body parts. He suggests that Zorba might eventually want to remove his sexual organs, which would have a much more life-altering and drastic result.

3. Describe the narrator's relationship with his old friend.

The narrator and his friend have a deep connection and love for one another. However, the connection is largely unspoken as the two men often argue rather than express emotion to one another. The soldier friend is more of an adventurer than the narrator, and often teases the narrator for being such a bookworm. The two men contrast one another; the narrator is more of a philosopher who is focused on a higher power, while the friend is a soldier who believes in living his life for his fellow man and his nation. The connection between the two men, despite their differences, is clear in their agreement to send mental messages to one another if they sense danger. This obviously indicates that they believe strongly in their connection and friendship.

4. How might Madame Hortense's romantic history challenge Zorba's concept of his own manliness?

Zorba believes in living for the day and that any impediment to freedom and manliness should be removed. Because he thinks sexual relationships are the ultimate in the physical life, he is helpless against the force of her own history. She has been romanced by legendary and powerful men, and Zorba cannot do anything to remove them as competitive forces from his own life. He offers to take on Canavaro's role in her life, but he has no power or awareness of how to actually fulfill that role.

5. How does the narrator try to get the widow out of his mind at the beginning of Chapter 10?

The narrator views the widow as a temptation of the Evil One and focuses on writing his Buddha Manuscript in order to exorcise her image and the lust he feels for her from his mind. To him, his writing is comparable to the force of savages facing beasts with their spears.

6. When Zorba tells the story of the old man who will never die, what does this show about his own and the narrator's perspectives on life and death?

Neither the narrator nor Zorba come to a conclusion about how one should live one's life. Zorba clearly lives as though each day is his last, in opposition to the old man in his story. The narrator is uncertain and contemplative about life and death and seems to change his mind slightly as he is influenced by different thinking.

7. What does Zorba represent in the story?

Zorba represents a man who lives for the physical world and ultimately for the individual self in that world. He is an agent of instinct and lacks theoretical reason for his actions. For the narrator, Zorba is a potential symbol of freedom in the narrator's quest to find freedom.

8. Describe the narrator's memory of his old friend while on their visit to the museum.

The narrator's old friend told him of his love for a painting by Rembrandt; a painting he says he will owe his greatest accomplishments to. As they are leaving the museum, they see a bird land on a statue of an Amazon and begin singing. The narrator asks what it might mean, and the friend recites a few lines that encourage the narrator not to bother himself with such thoughts.

9. When the narrator observes Zorba's ease with problem solving in Chapter 5, what figures come into his mind?

The narrator realizes that Zorba's mind is not stressed with education and that his problem solving is a result of his connection with the physical world. He compares Zorba to Alexander the Great cutting through the Gordian knot with his sword. His notes that it is difficult to miss with feet planted firmly and held by the weight of the entire body. This leads him to compare Zorba to the serpent worshiped by Africans. He notes that anything so connected with and touching the earth constantly must be superior in its understanding of the earth's workings.

10. Describe what happened while Zorba was at war that changed his mind about judging a person based on nationality.

While at war, Zorba murdered a Bulgarian priest who had been invading Greek villages and killing Greeks. Later, when Zorba sees the orphans of the priest, he realizes that nationality doesn't matter. Rather, "good" and "bad" are the only important classifications to consider.

This section contains 1,197 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Copyrights
BookRags
Zorba the Greek from BookRags. (c)2015 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.