Waiting for Godot Test | Final Test - Hard

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This test consists of 5 short answer questions and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. The second time the boy messenger comes, when Vladimir asks the boy about his brother, the boy says his brother is

2. In Act II, Vladimir tells Estragon that if he will help him pick up Pozzo, they will go together to

3. As Act I is ending, Vladimir tells Estragon that everything will be better tomorrow because

4. How is the tree different in Act II?

5. When Estragon tells Vladimir why he is going to go without shoes, Vladimir asks him if he is going to

Essay Topics

Essay Topic 1

There is almost nothing on the stage with the actors. There are very few props. How do you think this contributes to the overall feeling of the play? Why do you think Beckett used a bare tree on the stage? Why do you think that in the second act it has a few leaves? What point was Beckett trying to make, and how do you think it contributed to his overall message?

Essay Topic 2

Both Vladimir and Estragon suffer from constant pain. Why may Beckett have given them each a chronic condition that constantly occupied their attention? Pozzo and Lucky also have pain in their lives although, in the first act, it is different from the chronic conditions suffered by Vladimir and Estragon. Then, in the second act, Pozzo is afflicted with a condition that causes him a different kind of pain. How does Beckett use pain as a theme running throughout the play? How does this theme contribute to Beckett's overall message?

Essay Topic 3

Samuel Beckett's play, "Waiting for Godot," is considered part of the Theater of the Absurd. Theater of the Absurd writers joined existential (relating to existence) philosophy with dramatic action and characters to show how "absurd" life could be. Find at least three examples of absurd actions or dialogue, describe the examples, and explain why you think they show the absurdity of life.

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