The Anti-Federalist Papers; and, the Constitutional Convention Debates Test | Mid-Book Test - Hard

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This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. What did a legitimate government require, in James Madison's opinion?

2. What did delegates oppose in the Virginia Plan?

3. What was cut out when the Constitutional Convention doted down part of the Virginia Plan?

4. What was Mr. Wilson's feeling about the compromise?

5. Which form of government includes direct voting by the people?

Short Essay Questions

1. What were the "Federal Farmer's" arguments regarding ratification?

2. What did delegates object to in the Virginia Plan?

3. What did "Brutus" argue concerning standing armies?

4. What was Alexander Hamilton's argument about the need for a central government?

5. Where did the Federalist Papers come from?

6. What did delegates discuss regarding the appointment of judges?

7. Why did James Madison argue against the New Jersey Plan?

8. Describe the delegates' reaction to the New Jersey Plan.

9. What was James Madison's position on the election of the executive?

10. What were the forms of government being considered at the Constitutional Convention?

Essay Topics

Essay Topic 1

The Constitution was the result of a great deal of negotiation. What other opposition was there, besides the opposition between Federalists and Anti-Federalists? What parties found themselves in opposition? How did they resolve their opposition, and were their methods of compromise similar to the Great Compromise.

Essay Topic 2

How did the Constitution change between its first draft after being compiled, and the final draft that was ratified by the states?

Essay Topic 3

Explore the paradox that a government needs to be strong in order to protect the people from the government itself. How was this notion handled by the delegates at the Constitutional Convention? What allowances were made so that the government was neither too strong nor too weak? What allowances were made to protect individual freedom?

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