The Anti-Federalist Papers; and, the Constitutional Convention Debates Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. What complaints were lodged against the proposal to elect Senators in state legislatures?
(a) It would create a plutocracy.
(b) It would dissipate federal power among the states.
(c) It would over-represent the small states.
(d) It would give too much power to large states.

2. What did Mr. Sherman argue during the debate over the length of Senatorial term-lengths?
(a) Long terms will preserve continuity in government.
(b) Short terms allow bad rulers to be removed.
(c) Short terms create perpetual campaigns.
(d) Long terms allow leaders to learn on the job.

3. Where did Mr. Sherman say election should take place?
(a) Among sitting representatives.
(b) In the Electoral College.
(c) In the state legislatures.
(d) In the popular polls.

4. Alexander Hamilton gave a speech that expressed what value?
(a) The value of low tariffs.
(b) The value of abolishing slavery.
(c) The value of a strong federal government.
(d) The value of independent states.

5. What did the delegates debate concerning state laws?
(a) Whether state laws could set precedent for federal laws.
(b) Whether the federal government could control state laws.
(c) Whether the states could allow the death penalty.
(d) Whether state laws could govern inter-state trade.

6. What did all the delegates at the federal convention agree on?
(a) Laissez-faire economic policy.
(b) Government by consent.
(c) The rights of a king.
(d) The importance of a strong central government.

7. What would happen if government officers did not receive salaries, in the opinion of the man who proposed this?
(a) The government would consist solely of landed gentry.
(b) Men who needed money would be liable to be influenced by special interests.
(c) Legislators would have to have wealthy patrons.
(d) Men who lusted for power and money would not run for office.

8. What did the New Jersey Plan allow the federal government to do?
(a) Tax intra-state commerce.
(b) Support a Supreme Court.
(c) Regulate slavery.
(d) Maintain a standing army.

9. What was the Great Compromise?
(a) The creation of the Electoral College.
(b) Bring Texas into the union as a slave state, and Missouri as free.
(c) A bicameral legislature.
(d) Appoint judges for life, but allow them to be impeached.

10. What must the government use its power to protect the people from, in James Madison's opinion?
(a) Corruption.
(b) The government itself.
(c) Big businesses.
(d) Foreign influence.

11. What position did "Publius" advocate?
(a) Defending the new Constitution.
(b) Proposing an alternative to the Constitution.
(c) Attacking the new Constitution.
(d) Arguing against ratification of the Constitution.

12. Who was particularly concerned about the Virginia Plan?
(a) Southern states.
(b) Large states.
(c) Populous states.
(d) Small states.

13. What did James Madison recommend for the appointment of Supreme Court Justices?
(a) That judges should be appointed for seven-year terms.
(b) That appointments be beyond contest.
(c) That judges should be elected.
(d) That appointments be susceptible to two-thirds vote override by the Congress.

14. How did the South want the Constitution to regulate trade?
(a) The South wanted the Constitution to keep tariffs low indefinitely.
(b) The South wanted the Constitution to keep Congress from restricting trade.
(c) The South wanted the Constitution to let Congress set tariffs with a simple majority vote.
(d) The South wanted the Constitution not to regulate trade at all.

15. What did Mr. Sherman argue concerning the question of whether the executive should be chosen by the legislature?
(a) He argued that the executive should be elected by the people.
(b) He argued that the executive should be appointed by the Congress.
(c) He argued that the executive should be elected by the Congress.
(d) He argued that the executive should be appointed by the Supreme Court.

Short Answer Questions

1. Where should budget bills start, according to the compromise?

2. What did Alexander Hamilton propose in his speech?

3. What opinion bolstered Mr. Sherman's view about where election should take place?

4. Why did delegates argue for a judicial veto power?

5. What did Madison and Jefferson feel about Virginia?

(see the answer keys)

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