Sharpe's Waterloo: Richard Sharpe and the Waterloo Campaign Test | Final Test - Hard

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This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. What does Sharpe ponder also?

2. What does the Duke see to their south?

3. Which men are posted to reinforce the garrison defending Hougoumont?

4. What does Colonel MacDonnell ask Sharpe?

5. What does the Prince of Orange order?

Short Essay Questions

1. What charge of heavy cavalry is described in Chapter 15 and what two roles do the horses have?

2. What does John Rossendale tell his fellow officers about the condition of his sword and pistol in Chapter 10?

3. What is the difference between the disposition of the Allied Forces and the French in Chapter 13? For what does this afford the author an opportunity?

4. What stops the French from pursuing the retreating British army?

5. What is the difference between Napoleon and the Duke in how they come before their men and how their men acknowledge them?

6. What is a major failure on the French part that leads to their ultimate defeat?

7. Describe the area where the retreating British army takes up a position in Chapter 10.

8. What is it about the British muskets that proves the beginning of the French's downfall?

9. What happens to the British Heavy Cavalry unit with which John Rossendale is riding?

10. What does Sharpe tell Rossendale during their encounter in the woods?

Essay Topics

Write an essay for ONE of the following topics:

Essay Topic 1

Cornwell is masterful in his description of battles and life in general for a soldier during the Napoleonic Wars in the early 1820s. Discuss one of the following:

1. Trace and analyze Cornwells's descriptive passages about life as a soldier. How does he use descriptions of the five senses to make the reader feel s/he is there? Do you find his descriptions compelling? Seemingly accurate? How would the novel be different if Cornwell did not include such descriptive passages?

2. Analyze Cornwells's descriptive passages about the social structure of the times and discuss what you think it would be like to be a person of wealth and/or privilege such as John Rossendale, The Prince of Orange, The Duke of Wellington, and Simon Doggett. Contrast that to the lives of those who are in a lower social strata such as Sharpe and Harper or one in service to someone of wealth and/or privilege.

3. Describe and analyze Cornwell's descriptive passages about the topographical setting and the physical descriptions of the people. Does Cornwell do an adequate job of actually making the reader "see" the land/sea where the action is taking place? How about getting a visual image of the characters? How do the descriptions of the setting add to the novel? Do you like having an idea of how a character looks? How would the novel be different without such descriptions?

Essay Topic 2

Discuss one of the following:

1. Trace and analyze one major theme of Sharpe's Waterloo. Consider the following: How do one character's actions portray the theme you are analyzing? How does the setting contribute to that theme? Is the theme one that you would call a "universal" theme? If so, what other book or novel that you have read also includes this theme. If not, why don't you think it is a "universal" theme?

2. Trace and analyze two secondary themes of Sharpe's Waterloo. How does one character's actions portray the themes you are analyzing? How does the setting contribute to those themes? Is each theme one that you would call a "universal theme"? If so, what other book or novel that you have read also includes this theme. If not, why don't you think it is a "universal" theme?

3. What benefit is there in discussing and analyzing the themes of a work of fiction? Do you think most authors consciously develop themes in their works? Why or why not? Can there be accidental themes? What do you think is one possible "accidental" theme in Sharpe's Waterloo? Which theme in Sharpe's Waterloo speaks to you the most in your life? Why?

Essay Topic 3

Sharpe, despite his background, is an officer and a gentleman and is, therefore, accorded more respect and trust, even in enemy territory, than the common soldier. Discuss the following:

1. Does it seem likely that officers are usually more respectable than enlisted men back then? What about today? Why or why not.

2. Sharpe refuses his wife a divorce and yet maintains a mistress. Do you think this is how an officer and gentleman comports himself? Why or why not.

3. In the present military in the United States, both officers and enlisted can be held for court martial for adultery or having sexual relations with someone of inferior rank. Why do you think this is so? Do you agree with the policy?

(see the answer keys)

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