Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Religion and Philosophy Research Article from World Eras

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Myths. In ancient Mesopotamian religion there existed no single source of revelation. Theologians sought to explain and justify the existence of mankind, its institutions, and the cosmos through the development of myths. Their explanations varied with time and place, and many differing traditions came to exist side by side. Theologians viewed each myth as offering its own insight. Knowledge was cumulative. There existed no Bible, no orthodoxy, and no canonical compilation of theological insight. Each myth reflected its own, often independent, tradition.

Creation Myths. In the modern world people look for natural causes to explain matters as diverse as human conflict or the movement of stars in the heavens. War is the result of conflicts of interest; physical disease has organic origins; psychological factors influence emotions; and science is used to explain the motion of celestial bodies. The ancient Near Eastern world explained such things as results...

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This section contains 1,994 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Religion and Philosophy Encyclopedia Article
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World Eras
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