Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Religion and Philosophy Research Article from World Eras

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Sickness. For the theologian, sickness was a perplexing matter. Minor illness was attributed to random occurrences that all humans suffer, but serious health problems were attributed to external, supernatural forces. Each person was protected by a personal god or goddess, but because of unforeseen circumstances or sin, one's god could flee, leaving the unprotected individual vulnerable to attack by demons, ghosts, and other evil forces. Healers needed to determine if a "Hand of a Ghost" or an unknown human agent, such as a witch, had caused illness. Treatment was in the hands of the asu, "physician," and the ashipu, "magician or exorcist." Each had a role in healing the sick, and they often worked together to treat difficult cases. The physician prescribed salves and potions, and the magician battled the demons with spells, incantations, amulets, and rituals to exorcise evil forces.

Diagnosis. Not all sickness was believed...

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This section contains 2,192 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Ancient Mesopotamia 3300-331 B.C.E.: Religion and Philosophy Encyclopedia Article
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World Eras
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