The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 416 pages of information about The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci Volume 2.

1247.

it puts them aside with its trunk, so as not to trample them under foot; and it never hurts any thing unless when provoked.  When one has fallen into a pit the others fill up the pit with branches, earth and stones, thus raising the bottom that he may easily get out.  They greatly dread the noise of swine and fly in confusion, doing no less harm then, with their feet, to their own kind than to the enemy.  They delight in rivers and are always wandering about near them, though on account of their great weight they cannot swim.  They devour stones, and the trunks of trees are their favourite food.  They have a horror of rats.  Flies delight in their smell and settle on their back, and the beast scrapes its skin making its folds even and kills them.

1248.

When they cross rivers they send their young ones up against the stream of the water; thus, being set towards the fall, they break the united current of the water so that the current does not carry them away.  The dragon flings itself under the elephant’s body, and with its tail it ties its legs; with its wings and with its arms it also clings round its ribs and cuts its throat with its teeth, and the elephant falls upon it and the dragon is burst.  Thus, in its death it is revenged on its foe.

THE DRAGON.

These go in companies together, and they twine themselves after the manner of roots, and with their heads raised they cross lakes, and swim to where they find better pasture; and if they did not thus combine

1249.

they would be drowned, therefore they combine.

THE SERPENT.

The serpent is a very large animal.  When it sees a bird in the air it draws in its breath so strongly that it draws the birds into its mouth too.  Marcus Regulus, the consul of the Roman army was attacked, with his army, by such an animal and almost defeated.  And this animal, being killed by a catapult, measured 123 feet, that is 64 1/2 braccia and its head was high above all the trees in a wood.

THE BOA(?)

This is a very large snake which entangles itself round the legs of the cow so that it cannot move and then sucks it, in such wise that it almost dries it up.  In the time of Claudius the Emperor, there was killed, on the Vatican Hill,

1250.

one which had inside it a boy, entire, that it had swallowed.

THE MACLI.—­CAUGHT WHEN ASLEEP.

This beast is born in Scandinavia.  It has the shape of a great horse, excepting that the great length of its neck and of its ears make a difference.  It feeds on grass, going backwards, for it has so long an upper lip that if it went forwards it would cover up the grass.  Its legs are all in one piece; for this reason when it wants to sleep it leans against a tree, and the hunters, spying out the place where it is wont to sleep, saw the tree almost through, and then, when it leans against it to sleep, in its sleep it falls, and thus the hunters take it.  And every other mode of taking it is in vain, because it is incredibly swift in running.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci — Volume 2 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook