New Latin Grammar eBook

Charles Edwin Bennett
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 240 pages of information about New Latin Grammar.

2.  Vowel changes often occur in the process of composition.  Thus:—­

  a.  In the second member of compounds. (See Sec. 7, 1.)

  b.  The final vowel of the stem of the first member of the compound often
  appears as i where we should expect o or a; sometimes it is dropped
  altogether, and in case of consonant stems i is often inserted; as,—­

    signifer, standard-bearer;

    tubicen, trumpeter;

    magnanimus, high-minded;

    matricida, matricide.

159.  EXAMPLES OF COMPOUNDS.

1.  Nouns:—­

  a) Preposition + Noun; as,—­

    de-decus, disgrace;

    pro-avus, great-grandfather.

  b) Noun + Verb Stem; as,—­

    agri-cola, farmer;

    fratri-cida, fratricide.

2.  Adjectives:—­

  a) Preposition + Adjective (or Noun); as,—­

    per-magnus, very great;

    sub-obscurus, rather obscure;

    a-mens, frantic.

  b) Adjective + Noun; as,—­

    magn-animus, great-hearted;

    celeri-pes, swift-footed.

  c) Noun + Verb Stem; as,—­

    parti-ceps, sharing;

    morti-fer, death-dealing.

3.  Verbs:—­

The second member is always a verb.  The first may be—­

  a) A Noun; as,—­

    aedi-fico, build.

  b) An Adjective; as,—­

    ampli-fico, enlarge.

  c) An Adverb; as,—­

    male-dico, rail at.

  d) Another Verb; as,—­

    cale-facio, make warm.

  e) A Preposition; as,—­

    ab-jungo, detach;

    re-fero, bring back;

    dis-cerno, distinguish;

    ex-specto, await.

NOTE.—­Here belong the so-called INSEPARABLE PREPOSITIONS: 

    ambi- (amb-), around;

    dis- (dir-, di-), apart, asunder;

    por-, forward;

    red- (re-), back;

    sed- (se-), apart from;

    ve-, without.

4.  Adverbs:—­

These are of various types; as,—­

    antea, before;

    ilico (in loco), on the spot;

    imprimis, especially;

    obviam, in the way.

* * * * *

PART V.

* * * * *

SYNTAX.

* * * * *

160.  Syntax treats of the use of words in sentences

CHAPTER I.—­Sentences.

CLASSIFICATION OF SENTENCES.

161.  Sentences may be classified as follows:—­

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New Latin Grammar from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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