Forgot your password?  
Related Topics

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 200 pages of information about Crime.
the article sold, if he does not make a specific statement of a fact regarding the material contained in them or the amount, number, quality or the like.  He may lie, but to be safe he must know the kind of lie the law permits.  Many lies pass as “puffing goods” and are within the pale.  A trader is not expected to tell the truth.  What he can and cannot say may be determined only by a careful examination of the law, and not always then.

Infinite are the reasons men give for doing the things that their instincts bid them do.  All depends upon the strength of the instinct and the character of the machine; the restrictions and habits formed; and many other factors of which the man knows nothing.  In fact, all depends upon his endowment and the outside forces that move to action, and for none of these is he in any way to be praised or blamed.

Society seems to be almost oblivious to the emotional life of man.  The great masses of men have no capacity or chance to prepare a proper environment in the intense commercialism and mad rush of today.  The laws of trade and commerce give most men food, clothing and shelter but nothing more.  There is no beauty in their homes or surroundings; no music or art; no adventure or speculation.  Existence is a dead thing, a dreary round.  To many such people crime furnishes the only chance for adventure.  Take away emotions and life is hopelessly dull and commonplace.  The emotions of men must be fed just as the body must be fed.  To many religion has furnished this emotional life.  Churches have provided some art and some music.  But aside from the Catholic Church almost none of this is for the poor.  To many if not most people religion cannot take the place of joy.  Dogma and creed deaden and cannot appeal to the reason of man.  Still they have furnished a large part of the emotional life to great masses of men, without which existence would hold no hope or joy.  But this is not enough to fill most lives.  The element of joy is largely lacking.  To many it makes no appeal, although music and art and beauty do.  In no country has society so utterly neglected and ignored the emotional side of man as in America.  This has led many men to a life of adventure that for them has been possible only in crime.  Many others found this life in the saloon, mixed with influences not conducive to a normal life.  The closing of the saloons has added to the already serious need of providing for the innate feelings of men.  This is all the more important for America, as a large part of our population has come from lands where beauty and art and music have for generations been made a part of the common life of all.

VII

THE CRIMINAL

Follow Us on Facebook