Forgot your password?  

Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 270 pages of information about Slave Narratives.
Table of Contents
Section Page

Start of eBook1
WASHINGTON 19411
ARKANSAS NARRATIVES1
PART I1
INFORMANTS1
ILLUSTRATIONS1
Interviewer’s Comment6
Interviewer’s Comment15
Interviewer’s Comment20
22
Interviewer’s Comment27
Interviewer’s Comments29
House and Furniture32
Work as a Boy32
Free Negroes32
Marriage33
Corn Shuckings33
Rations33
Patrollers33
Mulattoes33
Whippings33
Freedom33
Wages Then34
Selling and Buying Slaves34
Refugees—­Jeff Davis34
Voters34
Ku Klux34
Self-Support and Support of Aged Slaves in Slave Times35
Little Rock35
Birth37
Persistence of Slave Customs37
First Negro Doctor in Tulip, Arkansas38
Schooling38
Father and Master39
Marriage39
Patrollers, Jayhawkers, Ku Klux, and Ku Klux Klan39
Slave Work39
Opinions39
Interviewer’s Comment40
Circumstances of Interview40
Personal History of Informant40
Text of Interview (Unedited)41
Ku Klux Klan42
Extra Comment43
Interviewer’s Comment63
Slave Sales, Whippings, Work66
Fun66
Church66
House, Furniture, Food66
How Freedom Came67
Right After the War67
Earliest Recollections67
Schooling67
Ku Klux67
Later Life67
Story told by Boston Blackwell77
Interviewer’s Comment83
(This may be continued)89
School During the War90
Interviewer’s Comment92
Slaves on Other Places94
Within the Yankee Lines94
Expectations of the Slaves94
What They Got94
Right After the War95
Schooling96
Ku Klux96
Nat Turner Rebellion96
Reconstruction Days96
Voting and Political Activities96
Songs97
Interviewer’s Comment99
100
Circumstances Of Interview101
Text of Interview102
Interviewer’s Comment102
Personal History of Informant102
103
Father Free Raised113
Slave Houses113
Slave Sales113
How Freedom Came114
Right After the War114
Occupation114
Random Opinions114
FATHER117
MOTHER118
HOW FREEDOM CAME118
WHAT THE SLAVES EXPECTED118
KU KLUX KLAN118
OCCUPATIONS120
IDEAS ABOUT THE PRESENT121
SCHOOLING122
122
EQUAL TO THE EMERGENCY124
124
Interviewer’s Comment129
132
133
Circumstances of Interview133
Personal History of Informant133
Text of Interview (Unedited)133
Early Life134
Schooling134
Status of Colored Girls135
Master’s Sons135
Patrollers135
Marriage and Sex Relationships135
Mother and Father’s Work135
Sustenance135
Father’s Brother135
Churches135
Amusement136
How Freedom Came136
Right after the War136
Life Since the War137
Freedom144
Patrollers147
Ku Klux147
Parents147
Slave Houses148
Furniture148
Food148
Right After the War148
Schooling148
Marriage149
Slave Sales149
Opinions149
Freedom155
Extra Comment156
House159
Furniture159
Food159
Clothes159
Contacts with Slaves and Slave Owners159
Leaving Richmond159
Occupations159
Voting160
Thoughts of Young People160
Interviewer’s Comment160
Freedom162
Ku Klux163
Follow Us on Facebook