Tess of the d'Urbervilles eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 439 pages of information about Tess of the d'Urbervilles.

They met continually; they could not help it.  They met daily in that strange and solemn interval, the twilight of the morning, in the violet or pink dawn; for it was necessary to rise early, so very early, here.  Milking was done betimes; and before the milking came the skimming, which began at a little past three.  It usually fell to the lot of some one or other of them to wake the rest, the first being aroused by an alarm-clock; and, as Tess was the latest arrival, and they soon discovered that she could be depended upon not to sleep though the alarm as others did, this task was thrust most frequently upon her.  No sooner had the hour of three struck and whizzed, than she left her room and ran to the dairyman’s door; then up the ladder to Angel’s, calling him in a loud whisper; then woke her fellow-milkmaids.  By the time that Tess was dressed Clare was downstairs and out in the humid air.  The remaining maids and the dairyman usually gave themselves another turn on the pillow, and did not appear till a quarter of an hour later.

The gray half-tones of daybreak are not the gray half-tones of the day’s close, though the degree of their shade may be the same.  In the twilight of the morning, light seems active, darkness passive; in the twilight of evening it is the darkness which is active and crescent, and the light which is the drowsy reverse.

Being so often—­possibly not always by chance—­the first two persons to get up at the dairy-house, they seemed to themselves the first persons up of all the world.  In these early days of her residence here Tess did not skim, but went out of doors at once after rising, where he was generally awaiting her.  The spectral, half-compounded, aqueous light which pervaded the open mead impressed them with a feeling of isolation, as if they were Adam and Eve.  At this dim inceptive stage of the day Tess seemed to Clare to exhibit a dignified largeness both of disposition and physique, an almost regnant power, possibly because he knew that at that preternatural time hardly any woman so well endowed in person as she was likely to be walking in the open air within the boundaries of his horizon; very few in all England.  Fair women are usually asleep at mid-summer dawns.  She was close at hand, and the rest were nowhere.

The mixed, singular, luminous gloom in which they walked along together to the spot where the cows lay often made him think of the Resurrection hour.  He little thought that the Magdalen might be at his side.  Whilst all the landscape was in neutral shade his companion’s face, which was the focus of his eyes, rising above the mist stratum, seemed to have a sort of phosphorescence upon it.  She looked ghostly, as if she were merely a soul at large.  In reality her face, without appearing to do so, had caught the cold gleam of day from the north-east; his own face, though he did not think of it, wore the same aspect to her.

It was then, as has been said, that she impressed him most deeply.  She was no longer the milkmaid, but a visionary essence of woman—­a whole sex condensed into one typical form.  He called her Artemis, Demeter, and other fanciful names half teasingly, which she did not like because she did not understand them.

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.