Tess of the d'Urbervilles eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 557 pages of information about Tess of the d'Urbervilles.

The bird’s-eye perspective before her was not so luxuriantly beautiful, perhaps, as that other one which she knew so well; yet it was more cheering.  It lacked the intensely blue atmosphere of the rival vale, and its heavy soils and scents; the new air was clear, bracing, ethereal.  The river itself, which nourished the grass and cows of these renowned dairies, flowed not like the streams in Blackmoor.  Those were slow, silent, often turbid; flowing over beds of mud into which the incautious wader might sink and vanish unawares.  The Froom waters were clear as the pure River of Life shown to the Evangelist, rapid as the shadow of a cloud, with pebbly shallows that prattled to the sky all day long.  There the water-flower was the lily; the crow-foot here.

Either the change in the quality of the air from heavy to light, or the sense of being amid new scenes where there were no invidious eyes upon her, sent up her spirits wonderfully.  Her hopes mingled with the sunshine in an ideal photosphere which surrounded her as she bounded along against the soft south wind.  She heard a pleasant voice in every breeze, and in every bird’s note seemed to lurk a joy.

Her face had latterly changed with changing states of mind, continually fluctuating between beauty and ordinariness, according as the thoughts were gay or grave.  One day she was pink and flawless; another pale and tragical.  When she was pink she was feeling less than when pale; her more perfect beauty accorded with her less elevated mood; her more intense mood with her less perfect beauty.  It was her best face physically that was now set against the south wind.

The irresistible, universal, automatic tendency to find sweet pleasure somewhere, which pervades all life, from the meanest to the highest, had at length mastered Tess.  Being even now only a young woman of twenty, one who mentally and sentimentally had not finished growing, it was impossible that any event should have left upon her an impression that was not in time capable of transmutation.

And thus her spirits, and her thankfulness, and her hopes, rose higher and higher.  She tried several ballads, but found them inadequate; till, recollecting the psalter that her eyes had so often wandered over of a Sunday morning before she had eaten of the tree of knowledge, she chanted:  “O ye Sun and Moon ...  O ye Stars ... ye Green Things upon the Earth ... ye Fowls of the Air ...  Beasts and Cattle ...  Children of Men ... bless ye the Lord, praise Him and magnify Him for ever!”

She suddenly stopped and murmured:  “But perhaps I don’t quite know the Lord as yet.”

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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