Tess of the d'Urbervilles eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 439 pages of information about Tess of the d'Urbervilles.

She philosophically noted dates as they came past in the revolution of the year; the disastrous night of her undoing at Trantridge with its dark background of The Chase; also the dates of the baby’s birth and death; also her own birthday; and every other day individualized by incidents in which she had taken some share.  She suddenly thought one afternoon, when looking in the glass at her fairness, that there was yet another date, of greater importance to her than those; that of her own death, when all these charms would have disappeared; a day which lay sly and unseen among all the other days of the year, giving no sign or sound when she annually passed over it; but not the less surely there.  When was it?  Why did she not feel the chill of each yearly encounter with such a cold relation?  She had Jeremy Taylor’s thought that some time in the future those who had known her would say:  “It is the ——­th, the day that poor Tess Durbeyfield died”; and there would be nothing singular to their minds in the statement.  Of that day, doomed to be her terminus in time through all the ages, she did not know the place in month, week, season or year.

Almost at a leap Tess thus changed from simple girl to complex woman.  Symbols of reflectiveness passed into her face, and a note of tragedy at times into her voice.  Her eyes grew larger and more eloquent.  She became what would have been called a fine creature; her aspect was fair and arresting; her soul that of a woman whom the turbulent experiences of the last year or two had quite failed to demoralize.  But for the world’s opinion those experiences would have been simply a liberal education.

She had held so aloof of late that her trouble, never generally known, was nearly forgotten in Marlott.  But it became evident to her that she could never be really comfortable again in a place which had seen the collapse of her family’s attempt to “claim kin”—­and, through her, even closer union—­with the rich d’Urbervilles.  At least she could not be comfortable there till long years should have obliterated her keen consciousness of it.  Yet even now Tess felt the pulse of hopeful life still warm within her; she might be happy in some nook which had no memories.  To escape the past and all that appertained thereto was to annihilate it, and to do that she would have to get away.

Was once lost always lost really true of chastity? she would ask herself.  She might prove it false if she could veil bygones.  The recuperative power which pervaded organic nature was surely not denied to maidenhood alone.

She waited a long time without finding opportunity for a new departure.  A particularly fine spring came round, and the stir of germination was almost audible in the buds; it moved her, as it moved the wild animals, and made her passionate to go.  At last, one day in early May, a letter reached her from a former friend of her mother’s, to whom she had addressed inquiries long before—­a person whom she had never seen—­that a skilful milkmaid was required at a dairy-house many miles to the southward, and that the dairyman would be glad to have her for the summer months.

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Project Gutenberg
Tess of the d'Urbervilles from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.