Tess of the d'Urbervilles eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 439 pages of information about Tess of the d'Urbervilles.

After again leaving Marlott, her home, she had got through the spring and summer without any great stress upon her physical powers, the time being mainly spent in rendering light irregular service at dairy-work near Port-Bredy to the west of the Blackmoor Valley, equally remote from her native place and from Talbothays.  She preferred this to living on his allowance.  Mentally she remained in utter stagnation, a condition which the mechanical occupation rather fostered than checked.  Her consciousness was at that other dairy, at that other season, in the presence of the tender lover who had confronted her there—­he who, the moment she had grasped him to keep for her own, had disappeared like a shape in a vision.

The dairy-work lasted only till the milk began to lessen, for she had not met with a second regular engagement as at Talbothays, but had done duty as a supernumerary only.  However, as harvest was now beginning, she had simply to remove from the pasture to the stubble to find plenty of further occupation, and this continued till harvest was done.

Of the five-and-twenty pounds which had remained to her of Clare’s allowance, after deducting the other half of the fifty as a contribution to her parents for the trouble and expense to which she had put them, she had as yet spent but little.  But there now followed an unfortunate interval of wet weather, during which she was obliged to fall back upon her sovereigns.

She could not bear to let them go.  Angel had put them into her hand, had obtained them bright and new from his bank for her; his touch had consecrated them to souvenirs of himself—­they appeared to have had as yet no other history than such as was created by his and her own experiences—­and to disperse them was like giving away relics.  But she had to do it, and one by one they left her hands.

She had been compelled to send her mother her address from time to time, but she concealed her circumstances.  When her money had almost gone a letter from her mother reached her.  Joan stated that they were in dreadful difficulty; the autumn rains had gone through the thatch of the house, which required entire renewal; but this could not be done because the previous thatching had never been paid for.  New rafters and a new ceiling upstairs also were required, which, with the previous bill, would amount to a sum of twenty pounds.  As her husband was a man of means, and had doubtless returned by this time, could she not send them the money?

Tess had thirty pounds coming to her almost immediately from Angel’s bankers, and, the case being so deplorable, as soon as the sum was received she sent the twenty as requested.  Part of the remainder she was obliged to expend in winter clothing, leaving only a nominal sum for the whole inclement season at hand.  When the last pound had gone, a remark of Angel’s that whenever she required further resources she was to apply to his father, remained to be considered.

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.