Tess of the d'Urbervilles eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 439 pages of information about Tess of the d'Urbervilles.

To dissipate the sadness of this recital Tess went and bade all her favourite cows goodbye, touching each of them with her hand, and as she and Clare stood side by side at leaving, as if united body and soul, there would have been something peculiarly sorry in their aspect to one who should have seen it truly; two limbs of one life, as they outwardly were, his arm touching hers, her skirts touching him, facing one way, as against all the dairy facing the other, speaking in their adieux as “we”, and yet sundered like the poles.  Perhaps something unusually stiff and embarrassed in their attitude, some awkwardness in acting up to their profession of unity, different from the natural shyness of young couples, may have been apparent, for when they were gone Mrs Crick said to her husband—­

“How onnatural the brightness of her eyes did seem, and how they stood like waxen images and talked as if they were in a dream!  Didn’t it strike ’ee that ’twas so?  Tess had always sommat strange in her, and she’s not now quite like the proud young bride of a well-be-doing man.”

They re-entered the vehicle, and were driven along the roads towards Weatherbury and Stagfoot Lane, till they reached the Lane inn, where Clare dismissed the fly and man.  They rested here a while, and entering the Vale were next driven onward towards her home by a stranger who did not know their relations.  At a midway point, when Nuttlebury had been passed, and where there were cross-roads, Clare stopped the conveyance and said to Tess that if she meant to return to her mother’s house it was here that he would leave her.  As they could not talk with freedom in the driver’s presence he asked her to accompany him for a few steps on foot along one of the branch roads; she assented, and directing the man to wait a few minutes they strolled away.

“Now, let us understand each other,” he said gently.  “There is no anger between us, though there is that which I cannot endure at present.  I will try to bring myself to endure it.  I will let you know where I go to as soon as I know myself.  And if I can bring myself to bear it—­if it is desirable, possible—­I will come to you.  But until I come to you it will be better that you should not try to come to me.”

The severity of the decree seemed deadly to Tess; she saw his view of her clearly enough; he could regard her in no other light than that of one who had practised gross deceit upon him.  Yet could a woman who had done even what she had done deserve all this?  But she could contest the point with him no further.  She simply repeated after him his own words.

“Until you come to me I must not try to come to you?”

“Just so.”

“May I write to you?”

“O yes—­if you are ill, or want anything at all.  I hope that will not be the case; so that it may happen that I write first to you.”

“I agree to the conditions, Angel; because you know best what my punishment ought to be; only—­only—­don’t make it more than I can bear!”

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.