Tess of the d'Urbervilles eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 439 pages of information about Tess of the d'Urbervilles.

The presence of a third person in the house would be extremely awkward just now, and, being already dressed, he opened the window and informed her that they could manage to shift for themselves that morning.  She had a milk-can in her hand, which he told her to leave at the door.  When the dame had gone away he searched in the back quarters of the house for fuel, and speedily lit a fire.  There was plenty of eggs, butter, bread, and so on in the larder, and Clare soon had breakfast laid, his experiences at the dairy having rendered him facile in domestic preparations.  The smoke of the kindled wood rose from the chimney without like a lotus-headed column; local people who were passing by saw it, and thought of the newly-married couple, and envied their happiness.

Angel cast a final glance round, and then going to the foot of the stairs, called in a conventional voice—­

“Breakfast is ready!”

He opened the front door, and took a few steps in the morning air.  When, after a short space, he came back she was already in the sitting-room mechanically readjusting the breakfast things.  As she was fully attired, and the interval since his calling her had been but two or three minutes, she must have been dressed or nearly so before he went to summon her.  Her hair was twisted up in a large round mass at the back of her head, and she had put on one of the new frocks—­a pale blue woollen garment with neck-frillings of white.  Her hands and face appeared to be cold, and she had possibly been sitting dressed in the bedroom a long time without any fire.  The marked civility of Clare’s tone in calling her seemed to have inspired her, for the moment, with a new glimmer of hope.  But it soon died when she looked at him.

The pair were, in truth, but the ashes of their former fires.  To the hot sorrow of the previous night had succeeded heaviness; it seemed as if nothing could kindle either of them to fervour of sensation any more.

He spoke gently to her, and she replied with a like undemonstrativeness.  At last she came up to him, looking in his sharply-defined face as one who had no consciousness that her own formed a visible object also.

“Angel!” she said, and paused, touching him with her fingers lightly as a breeze, as though she could hardly believe to be there in the flesh the man who was once her lover.  Her eyes were bright, her pale cheek still showed its wonted roundness, though half-dried tears had left glistening traces thereon; and the usually ripe red mouth was almost as pale as her cheek.  Throbbingly alive as she was still, under the stress of her mental grief the life beat so brokenly that a little further pull upon it would cause real illness, dull her characteristic eyes, and make her mouth thin.

She looked absolutely pure.  Nature, in her fantastic trickery, had set such a seal of maidenhood upon Tess’s countenance that he gazed at her with a stupefied air.

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.