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Tess of the d'Urbervilles eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 439 pages of information about Tess of the d'Urbervilles.

“Thank God!” murmured Clare; and yet he was conscious of a pang of bitterness at the thought—­approximately true, though not wholly so—­that having shifted the burden of her life to his shoulders, she was now reposing without care.

He turned away to descend; then, irresolute, faced round to her door again.  In the act he caught sight of one of the d’Urberville dames, whose portrait was immediately over the entrance to Tess’s bedchamber.  In the candlelight the painting was more than unpleasant.  Sinister design lurked in the woman’s features, a concentrated purpose of revenge on the other sex—­so it seemed to him then.  The Caroline bodice of the portrait was low—­precisely as Tess’s had been when he tucked it in to show the necklace; and again he experienced the distressing sensation of a resemblance between them.

The check was sufficient.  He resumed his retreat and descended.

His air remained calm and cold, his small compressed mouth indexing his powers of self-control; his face wearing still that terrible sterile expression which had spread thereon since her disclosure.  It was the face of a man who was no longer passion’s slave, yet who found no advantage in his enfranchisement.  He was simply regarding the harrowing contingencies of human experience, the unexpectedness of things.  Nothing so pure, so sweet, so virginal as Tess had seemed possible all the long while that he had adored her, up to an hour ago; but

       The little less, and what worlds away!

He argued erroneously when he said to himself that her heart was not indexed in the honest freshness of her face; but Tess had no advocate to set him right.  Could it be possible, he continued, that eyes which as they gazed never expressed any divergence from what the tongue was telling, were yet ever seeing another world behind her ostensible one, discordant and contrasting?

He reclined on his couch in the sitting-room, and extinguished the light.  The night came in, and took up its place there, unconcerned and indifferent; the night which had already swallowed up his happiness, and was now digesting it listlessly; and was ready to swallow up the happiness of a thousand other people with as little disturbance or change of mien.

XXXVI

Clare arose in the light of a dawn that was ashy and furtive, as though associated with crime.  The fireplace confronted him with its extinct embers; the spread supper-table, whereon stood the two full glasses of untasted wine, now flat and filmy; her vacated seat and his own; the other articles of furniture, with their eternal look of not being able to help it, their intolerable inquiry what was to be done?  From above there was no sound; but in a few minutes there came a knock at the door.  He remembered that it would be the neighbouring cottager’s wife, who was to minister to their wants while they remained here.

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