Tess of the d'Urbervilles eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 439 pages of information about Tess of the d'Urbervilles.

“O mother, mother!” murmured Tess.

She was recognizing how light was the touch of events the most oppressive upon Mrs Durbeyfield’s elastic spirit.  Her mother did not see life as Tess saw it.  That haunting episode of bygone days was to her mother but a passing accident.  But perhaps her mother was right as to the course to be followed, whatever she might be in her reasons.  Silence seemed, on the face of it, best for her adored one’s happiness:  silence it should be.

Thus steadied by a command from the only person in the world who had any shadow of right to control her action, Tess grew calmer.  The responsibility was shifted, and her heart was lighter than it had been for weeks.  The days of declining autumn which followed her assent, beginning with the month of October, formed a season through which she lived in spiritual altitudes more nearly approaching ecstasy than any other period of her life.

There was hardly a touch of earth in her love for Clare.  To her sublime trustfulness he was all that goodness could be—­knew all that a guide, philosopher, and friend should know.  She thought every line in the contour of his person the perfection of masculine beauty, his soul the soul of a saint, his intellect that of a seer.  The wisdom of her love for him, as love, sustained her dignity; she seemed to be wearing a crown.  The compassion of his love for her, as she saw it, made her lift up her heart to him in devotion.  He would sometimes catch her large, worshipful eyes, that had no bottom to them looking at him from their depths, as if she saw something immortal before her.

She dismissed the past—­trod upon it and put it out, as one treads on a coal that is smouldering and dangerous.

She had not known that men could be so disinterested, chivalrous, protective, in their love for women as he.  Angel Clare was far from all that she thought him in this respect; absurdly far, indeed; but he was, in truth, more spiritual than animal; he had himself well in hand, and was singularly free from grossness.  Though not cold-natured, he was rather bright than hot—­less Byronic than Shelleyan; could love desperately, but with a love more especially inclined to the imaginative and ethereal; it was a fastidious emotion which could jealously guard the loved one against his very self.  This amazed and enraptured Tess, whose slight experiences had been so infelicitous till now; and in her reaction from indignation against the male sex she swerved to excess of honour for Clare.

They unaffectedly sought each other’s company; in her honest faith she did not disguise her desire to be with him.  The sum of her instincts on this matter, if clearly stated, would have been that the elusive quality of her sex which attracts men in general might be distasteful to so perfect a man after an avowal of love, since it must in its very nature carry with it a suspicion of art.

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.