Tess of the d'Urbervilles eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 439 pages of information about Tess of the d'Urbervilles.

She had not heard him enter, and hardly realized his presence there.  She was yawning, and he saw the red interior of her mouth as if it had been a snake’s.  She had stretched one arm so high above her coiled-up cable of hair that he could see its satin delicacy above the sunburn; her face was flushed with sleep, and her eyelids hung heavy over their pupils.  The brim-fulness of her nature breathed from her.  It was a moment when a woman’s soul is more incarnate than at any other time; when the most spiritual beauty bespeaks itself flesh; and sex takes the outside place in the presentation.

Then those eyes flashed brightly through their filmy heaviness, before the remainder of her face was well awake.  With an oddly compounded look of gladness, shyness, and surprise, she exclaimed—­“O Mr Clare!  How you frightened me—­I—­”

There had not at first been time for her to think of the changed relations which his declaration had introduced; but the full sense of the matter rose up in her face when she encountered Clare’s tender look as he stepped forward to the bottom stair.

“Dear, darling Tessy!” he whispered, putting his arm round her, and his face to her flushed cheek.  “Don’t, for Heaven’s sake, Mister me any more.  I have hastened back so soon because of you!”

Tess’s excitable heart beat against his by way of reply; and there they stood upon the red-brick floor of the entry, the sun slanting in by the window upon his back, as he held her tightly to his breast; upon her inclining face, upon the blue veins of her temple, upon her naked arm, and her neck, and into the depths of her hair.  Having been lying down in her clothes she was warm as a sunned cat.  At first she would not look straight up at him, but her eyes soon lifted, and his plumbed the deepness of the ever-varying pupils, with their radiating fibrils of blue, and black, and gray, and violet, while she regarded him as Eve at her second waking might have regarded Adam.

“I’ve got to go a-skimming,” she pleaded, “and I have on’y old Deb to help me to-day.  Mrs Crick is gone to market with Mr Crick, and Retty is not well, and the others are gone out somewhere, and won’t be home till milking.”

As they retreated to the milk-house Deborah Fyander appeared on the stairs.

“I have come back, Deborah,” said Mr Clare, upwards.  “So I can help Tess with the skimming; and, as you are very tired, I am sure, you needn’t come down till milking-time.”

Possibly the Talbothays milk was not very thoroughly skimmed that afternoon.  Tess was in a dream wherein familiar objects appeared as having light and shade and position, but no particular outline.  Every time she held the skimmer under the pump to cool it for the work her hand trembled, the ardour of his affection being so palpable that she seemed to flinch under it like a plant in too burning a sun.

Then he pressed her again to his side, and when she had done running her forefinger round the leads to cut off the cream-edge, he cleaned it in nature’s way; for the unconstrained manners of Talbothays dairy came convenient now.

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.