Tess of the d'Urbervilles eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 439 pages of information about Tess of the d'Urbervilles.

The night was as sultry as the day.  There was no coolness after dark unless on the grass.  Roads, garden-paths, the house-fronts, the barton-walls were warm as hearths, and reflected the noontime temperature into the noctambulist’s face.

He sat on the east gate of the dairy-yard, and knew not what to think of himself.  Feeling had indeed smothered judgement that day.

Since the sudden embrace, three hours before, the twain had kept apart.  She seemed stilled, almost alarmed, at what had occurred, while the novelty, unpremeditation, mastery of circumstance disquieted him—­palpitating, contemplative being that he was.  He could hardly realize their true relations to each other as yet, and what their mutual bearing should be before third parties thenceforward.

Angel had come as pupil to this dairy in the idea that his temporary existence here was to be the merest episode in his life, soon passed through and early forgotten; he had come as to a place from which as from a screened alcove he could calmly view the absorbing world without, and, apostrophizing it with Walt Whitman—­

  Crowds of men and women attired in the usual costumes,
  How curious you are to me!—­

resolve upon a plan for plunging into that world anew.  But behold, the absorbing scene had been imported hither.  What had been the engrossing world had dissolved into an uninteresting outer dumb-show; while here, in this apparently dim and unimpassioned place, novelty had volcanically started up, as it had never, for him, started up elsewhere.

Every window of the house being open, Clare could hear across the yard each trivial sound of the retiring household.  The dairy-house, so humble, so insignificant, so purely to him a place of constrained sojourn that he had never hitherto deemed it of sufficient importance to be reconnoitred as an object of any quality whatever in the landscape; what was it now?  The aged and lichened brick gables breathed forth “Stay!” The windows smiled, the door coaxed and beckoned, the creeper blushed confederacy.  A personality within it was so far-reaching in her influence as to spread into and make the bricks, mortar, and whole overhanging sky throb with a burning sensibility.  Whose was this mighty personality?  A milkmaid’s.

It was amazing, indeed, to find how great a matter the life of the obscure dairy had become to him.  And though new love was to be held partly responsible for this, it was not solely so.  Many besides Angel have learnt that the magnitude of lives is not as to their external displacements, but as to their subjective experiences.  The impressionable peasant leads a larger, fuller, more dramatic life than the pachydermatous king.  Looking at it thus, he found that life was to be seen of the same magnitude here as elsewhere.

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.