Sylvia Plath | Critical Essay by Bruce Bawer

This literature criticism consists of approximately 22 pages of analysis & critique of Sylvia Plath.
This section contains 6,329 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Bruce Bawer

Critical Essay by Bruce Bawer

SOURCE: Bawer, Bruce. “Sylvia Plath and the Poetry of Confession.” The New Criterion 9, no. 6 (February, 1991): 18-27.

In the following essay, Bawer contends that Plath's extreme popularity as a confessional poet in the 1960s can be attributed more to her reputation as an oppressed and victimized existentialist than to the literary merit of her works.

Back when America was careening from the Eisenhower era—the “tranquillized Fifties,” as Robert Lowell called them—toward the Age of Aquarius, American poetry was undergoing a dramatic shift as well. A period of highly controlled, formal, and impersonal poetry, dominated by the likes of Richard Wilbur and Anthony Hecht, gave way with surprising rapidity to one of unrestrained, exceedingly personal free verse, often about extreme emotional states, by such poets as John Berryman, Anne Sexton...

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This section contains 6,329 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Bruce Bawer
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