Orlando: A Biography | Literature Criticism Critical Essay by Pamela L. Caughie

This literature criticism consists of approximately 17 pages of analysis & critique of Orlando: A Biography.
This section contains 4,826 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
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Critical Essay by Pamela L. Caughie

SOURCE: "Virginia Woolf's Double Discourse," in Discontented Discourses: Feminism/Textual Intervention/Psychoanalysis, edited by Marleen S. Barr and Richard Feldstein, University of Illinois Press, 1989, pp. 41-53.

In the following essay, Caughie challenges feminist readings of Orlando.

Written by a feminist (Virginia Woolf), for a bisexual (Vita Sackville-West), about an androgyne (Orlando), the novel Orlando would seem to be the quintessential feminist text. And that, indeed, is what it is in danger of becoming, just as Woolf is in danger of becoming the acclaimed Mother of Us All. In promoting Virginia Woolf's Orlando as a feminist work, feminist critics have picked the right text, but for the wrong reasons. Orlando works as a feminist text not because of what it says about sexual identity but because of what it manages not to say; not because of what it...

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This section contains 4,826 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Pamela L. Caughie