M. Butterfly | Criticism

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of M. Butterfly.
This section contains 4,919 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Suzanne Kehde

SOURCE: Kehde, Suzanne. “Engendering the Imperial Subject: The (De)Construction of (Western) Masculinity in David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly and Graham Greene's The Quiet American.” In Fictions of Masculinity: Crossing Cultures, Crossing Sexualities, edited by Peter F. Murphy, pp. 241-54. New York: New York University Press, 1994.

In the following essay, Kehde argues that M. Butterfly functions as a powerful critique of imperialism by exposing the underlying gender-based structure of imperialistic thinking.

By the time of his death this month at the age of eighty-six, Greene had become a kind of Grand Old Man of the left, and The Quiet American stood as his anti-imperialist masterpiece.

—Richard West, “Graham Greene and The Quiet American

Richard West's summary judgment1 described a text so different from the one I remembered that it sent me back to reread Greene's novel set in Vietnam at the moment when, unnoticed by the American public...

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This section contains 4,919 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Suzanne Kehde
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Critical Essay by Suzanne Kehde from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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