Egmont (play) | Critical Essay by Edward T. Larkin

This literature criticism consists of approximately 36 pages of analysis & critique of Egmont (play).
This section contains 10,735 words
(approx. 36 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Edward T. Larkin

Critical Essay by Edward T. Larkin

SOURCE: Larkin, Edward T. “Goethe's Egmont: Political Revolution and Personal Transformation.” Michigan Germanic Studies 17, no. 1 (spring 1991): 28-50.

In the following essay, Larkin explores the significance of political revolution in Egmont, deeming it a “means toward societal transformation and political self-determination.”

One of the central issues in Goethe's Egmont, as indicated by the author's recollection in 1825 of the revolutionary events in the Netherlands in 1786, concerns the desirability of revolution as a means toward societal transformation and political self-determination.1 One can distinguish the play's characters by their distinctive responses to the question of the legitimacy of rebellion. The most ardent proponent of the republican, pro-revolutionary stance is the aptly named Vansen (one may wonder whether Goethe had “Wahnsinn” in mind), while Philip II and his surrogate Alba remain...

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This section contains 10,735 words
(approx. 36 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Edward T. Larkin
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