Dario Fo | Critical Essay by Joseph Farrell

This literature criticism consists of approximately 18 pages of analysis & critique of Dario Fo.
This section contains 5,149 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Joseph Farrell

SOURCE: "Variations on a Theme: Respecting Dario Fo," in Modern Drama, Vol. XLI, No. 1, Spring 1998, pp. 19-29.

In this essay, Farrell discusses the difficulties inherent in attempting to translate Fo's works. Fo, he states, "requires more than standard translation techniques. He requires deep understanding tempered by affection. The adapter is a presence in Fo translation because he is needed. "

A translator is conventionally expected to content himself with a condition of self-effacing invisibility, which surpasses anything even Victorian parents once imposed on their offspring. The good translator should be neither seen nor heard. He should fade into the background, and should expect that if his presence is noted, it is as a prelude to some censure or reproach. A translator will receive attention only when responsible for some gaffe, transgression or solecism which will require discussion and correction at a later date, once the guests...

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This section contains 5,149 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Critical Essay by Joseph Farrell
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Literature Criticism Series
Critical Essay by Joseph Farrell from Literature Criticism Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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