Sylvia Plath Biography

This Biography consists of approximately 12 pages of information about the life of Sylvia Plath.
This section contains 3,453 words
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Dictionary of Literary Biography on Sylvia Plath

In "Three Women," the final poem of Winter Trees (1971), Sylvia Plath speaks through the voice of a woman in a maternity ward, whose words provide a fitting statement for the poet's singular fixation with annihilation:


A power is growing on me an old tenacity.

I am breaking apart like the world.

There is this blackness,

This ram of blackness. I fold my hands on a mountain.

The air is thick. It is thick with this working.

I am used. I am drummed into use.

My eyes are squeezed by this blackness.

I see nothing.


Composed during the last year of Plath's life, "Three Women" foreshadows the poet's self-asphyxiation in February 1963. In all of the poems written during the two-year period immediately preceding her suicide, including those in Ariel (1965) and Crossing the Water (1971), Plath expresses her anguish with her experiences as a writer, a wife, and a mother. She...

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This section contains 3,453 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Sylvia Plath Biography
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