A Yellow Raft in Blue Water Themes

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In 1979, Michael Dorris wrote that "there is no such thing as 'Native American literature,' though it may yet, someday, come into being." Among the requirements for such a literature, Dorris continued, was a "shared consciousness, an inherently identifiable world-view." Expanding on this theme of Identity in a 1992 essay, Owens notes that in A Yellow Raft in Blue Water, for the most part, "the individual who would 'be' Indian rather than 'play' Indian is faced with an overwhelming challenge." Only Aunt Ida "becomes... the bearer of the identity and order that are so fragile they may perish in a single generation if unarticulated " Although Ida, too, is unavoidably influenced by the bombardment of mainstream culture, Owens notes that "she can take off her earphones and wig, turn off the television soap operas, and become a story-teller, leaving her 'savings'-a recovered sense of self, Identity, authenticity-to Rayona." The other...

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This section contains 1,120 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the A Yellow Raft in Blue Water Study Guide
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A Yellow Raft in Blue Water from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.