Wringer Themes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 49 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Wringer.
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The most important theme in the book is self-knowledge. Even as a very young boy Palmer recalls the horror of the Pigeon Shoot and cannot understand why all the other people enjoy it. As Palmer grows up, the memory of that first Pigeon Shoot haunts him. He is in conflict with others around him, especially his father whose skill at the event is evidenced by a trophy sitting on the living room mantel. The conflict that Palmer experiences is due to his sensitivity and compassion for all living things while living in a town which encourages killing for profit.

Even the milestone of a tenth birthday is not something to be celebrated in Palmer's mind, as that day will signify his eligibility to participate as a wringer in the Pigeon Shoot. Palmer's sensitivity is extended to Dorothy, too, as he ultimately rejects Beans' method of cruel teasing and...

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This section contains 764 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Wringer Study Guide
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