Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee - Study Guide The Utes Must Go! Summary & Analysis

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The Ute Indians living in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado had been friendly toward the white people until the U.S. government bega to use force against them in 1863 via a treaty banning them to live on the west side of the Continental Divide. In addition, any gold or minerals in their new territory were property of white men who are awarded complete access. Five years later, the government determines that the Utes still have too much land and Chief Ouray the Arrow signs another treaty lessening the Ute territory to 16 million acres.

The Utes continue their attempts to maintain their land until 1868 when a new Indian agent, Nathan Meeker, orders the Utes to move to the White River area and establish a farming lifestyle. Meeker's plan is to transition the Utes to an agrarian economy and convert them to Christianity...

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This section contains 432 words
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Buy the Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee Study Guide
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